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Echinacea wilt?

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Denise, Aug 6, 2010.

  1. Denise

    Denise Apprentice Gardener

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    I managed to get hold of 3 Tikki Torch Echinacea. They are in 2 litre pots, quite tall and have flowerheads. I was going to plant them in their permanent position this weekend, but all of a sudden the heads have wilted very badly. In fact on some the stems have bent almost in half. Any ideas please?:help:
     
  2. PeterS

    PeterS Total Gardener

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    Hi Denise.

    I was going to say it could be lack of water. Echinacea purpurea are always quoted as being drought resistant. But mine, which are in the border hang their heads quite regularly if they don't get enough water. But they haven't done that so far this year for me. They always recover after a drink.

    But having said that I had a Google and found this http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/peren/msg0707365818074.html it seems that this may be a Tikki Torch problem. My understanding is that the orange hybrids are not as robust as the normal E. purpurea.
     
  3. barnaby

    barnaby Gardener

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    Hello Peter

    Having just purchased a new Echinacea 'Tomato Soup' am now concerned since it is somehat Orange in colour (almost tomato red even) - will keep an eye on it......
     
  4. PeterS

    PeterS Total Gardener

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    Barnaby - that variety looks stunning - I would be interested to hear how the new varieties do. For a long time there was only a small number of cultivars, but they were all of the purple one Echinacea purpurea and frankly they all look the same. But suddenly there are numerous new cultivars with various shades of yellow added to the purple.
     
  5. ARMANDII

    ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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    I love Echinaceas' but in the early years struggled to keep them happy on my sandy soil. They're, as previously said, supposed to be "drought resistant" but that's a mis-nomer! They like it fairly moist, but not getting their feet wet, and in the end I dug a pit, filled it with garden compost, and they are thriving. So your problem probably was lack of water!
     
  6. PeterS

    PeterS Total Gardener

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    Hi Armandii.

    I am glad you too have had the same experience. I have never understood this drought resistence idea, mine were always one of the first to wilt for lack of water. Perhaps they mean that they will not die from a lack of water, albeit looking quite pathetic.

    I have seen it pointed out a number of times that many books just copy from each other, and consequently perpetuate myths. Some time ago I read in a number of books that the way to propagate Cirsium rivulare was by seed. At a big flower show, I asked the people on a stand why I never saw any seed advertised. They, and the people on the next stand all fell about laughing. They then explained the Cirsium rivulare was sterile and couldn't produce seed, but they were all aware of the literature that said propagate by seed.
     
  7. theplantman

    theplantman Apprentice Gardener

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    Interesting....i thonk lots of 'drought' resistant plants are first to show signs of sufferin g in droughts......but as you say peter I think it means will not die....perhaps switching off the flowers and allowing them to wilt...even loosing a few leaves is a protection thing....so not good for the gardener but at least the plant survives. A similar example is Cystus, in the garden centre it was always the fist to suffer on a hot day.....somedays we could funk them in water.....by the afternoon the pots were light as feather....here I think part of cystus's drought resistance is to quickly find and use any available water...making it really drought resistant in the 'wild' but the complete opposite in a pot.
     
  8. ARMANDII

    ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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    Hi Plantsman, I agree with what you say, but plants in pots and "them that's in the ground" live by different rules when it comes to watering. Potted plants have a restricted area and depend on us to water them. Plants in the soil will, generally, find they own supply of water by the growth and extension of their roots.
    The problem cu
     
  9. ARMANDII

    ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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    Hi Plantsman, I agree with what you say. There's a lot a mis-labeling of a plant's characteristics - and usually on the optimistic side! But lets face it plants in pots have to live by different rules than "them that's in the ground". A plant in the pot has restricted root space and relies on us to water it regularly whereas a plant in
    the ground can find water by extension and growth of it's roots. The problem with some plants it that you have to find and supply soil conditions that you may not have at that moment in your garden.[hr]
    Hi PeterS, Another plant I love and grow in numbers and had trouble with in the early years is Monarda.
    I planted the first ones according to the nursery instructions and from reading in the books. WRONG! I had to give the Monarda the same treatment as Enchinacea and now theiy're growing happily side by side. As you say, what's in black and white isn't always right. There's a lot of published "expert" authors out there
    that have done exactly as you said - copied from other sources without actually knowing enough to tell if the information is right. I will admit to a vice, in that I have a library of a couple of hundred books [if not more!]
    covering all sorts of gardening subjects. Some of the oldest go back to 1835 [no, I didn't buy the first one when it came out!] and it's surprising how knowledgeable and what really good understanding of gardening and a plant's needs they were. The only thing that makes me shiver when reading some of the books is the
    great use of deadly chemicals they used in the "good old days"
     
  10. barnaby

    barnaby Gardener

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    We grow Echinaceas on sandy soil and (touch wood), we have never seen the Echinacea 'wilt'
    which you speak of. Am now waiting with baited breath to see new shoot on my
    'Tomato Soup' variety which I planted at the end of last summer (fingers crossed)........
     
  11. ARMANDII

    ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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    I might search out "Tomato Soup" on the net - sounds tasty! - sorry, couldn't resist!!
     
  12. barnaby

    barnaby Gardener

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    I bought my plant at great expense from a garden which we visited last year with the local Gardening Club. It does look very good nd the colour is very strong but no sign of new growth as yet.

    Am sure you will be able to find it on the net Armandii.......
     
  13. ARMANDII

    ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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    Thanks, Barnaby, your enthusiasm has sparked me to look for it. Sometimes it's just impossible to resist the temptation!!
     
  14. ARMANDII

    ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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    Just ordered Echinacea Tomato Soup from Best4Plants [it was the cheapest!], Barnaby. I can't believe the vividness of the colour in the photograph! I just hope my plant attains the same brightness. Thanks for putting me onto it
     
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