1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

re cucumber.

Discussion in 'Greenhouse Growing' started by peter121, Dec 3, 2016.

  1. peter121

    peter121 Apprentice Gardener

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2016
    Messages:
    13
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    cheshire
    Ratings:
    +8
    hello.am i biting of more than i can chew. how to grow a cucumber plant in a pot in the greenhouse. easy or difficult. and best way to do this when to plant the seeds etc. thank you for looking. regards peter.
     
  2. JWK

    JWK Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    17,767
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Surrey
    Ratings:
    +15,273
    Whereabouts are you Peter? It would help to put your location in your profile then we can give better advice. Also is this a heated greenhouse?

    Assuming you are in the Uk and with an unheated greenhouse you will have to wait till next April to sow the seeds.
     
  3. Trunky

    Trunky ...who nose about gardening

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    Messages:
    2,538
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Gardener
    Location:
    Ipswich
    Ratings:
    +8,511
    Hi Peter and welcome to GC. :dbgrtmb:

    It's perfectly possible to grow cucumbers in pots in the greenhouse. I grow mine in the greenhouse in large 10/15 litre pots with fairly good results each year.

    A few suggestions.

    Choose an F1 hybrid variety which only produces female flowers.
    Sow just one seed at a time in a small pot, then plant it into the larger pot when the roots have filled the small pot.
    Fill the large pot with a soil based compost, or some good garden soil with leaf mould added, cucumbers take up a lot of water on hot days, more 'open' composts containing a high proportion of peat will quickly be sucked dry by the cucumber plant with its large leaves.
    Don't be in a hurry to sow the seeds in spring, late April/early May is soon enough, cucumbers dislike being cold and are more likely to fail as a result.

    Hope you find this useful.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Informative Informative x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  4. peter121

    peter121 Apprentice Gardener

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2016
    Messages:
    13
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    cheshire
    Ratings:
    +8
    thanks for info trunky. il be patient and wait till spring.regards peter.
     
  5. Loofah

    Loofah Well used member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    4,305
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Business operations specialist
    Location:
    Guildford
    Ratings:
    +4,217
    If you're anything like the rest of us you'll be far too impatient to wait til April!
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  6. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Messages:
    22,093
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    joinery
    Location:
    Mid Kent
    Ratings:
    +14,838
    Not that I grow them anymore, but I think its the one greenhouse plant that people sow too early, it is really a plant of almost tropical conditions and it's not about how high the temperatures rise to during the day in a greenhouse, it's about how low they fall at night.

    Good growing conditions are always about how low it goes, and when you bear in mind we can still be getting frost in late April, you have to admit it's a gamble getting cue seeds going before late April at the earliest.

    If they get chilled they don't necessarily die, they just hang on, in suspended animation, making you think they are still viable, but once chilled there is no going back.
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
  7. Dave W

    Dave W Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Messages:
    6,060
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Anything I fancy and can afford!
    Location:
    Tay Valley
    Ratings:
    +2,723
    I usually sow in early to mid April, but bring them on in big pots in our heated porch before I plant out in a polytunnel in mid May. Cucs as far as I remember, don't like temperatures below 10C as it sets them back.
     

Share This Page