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Confession time.... collecting seeds on holidays

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Selleri, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. Selleri

    Selleri Gardener

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    Right... I hope I'm not the only one who can't resist collecting seeds whilst on holidays in south. I'm fully aware of the risks of potentially introducing a new Japanese Knotweed [​IMG] into North Tyneside ecosystem so always swear to keep my seedlings as houseplants.

    And then there are the pests, viruses and diseases to consider. [​IMG]

    And yet again, we just returned from Portugal with a plump seedpod of this , it was such a lovely twining climber with carnivorous looking blooms, some prickly pear seeds from a ripe, stolen fruit eaten by my daughter and a legume- type seedpod from an unknown tree. :redface: I'll soak and sow them all tomorrow :biggrin:

    Do you collect seeds or cuttings on holidays? Any thoughts on the risks, any success stories or cautionary tales?
     
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    • Redwing

      Redwing Wild Gardener

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      I’m pretty sure it is legal to transport plant material within the EU as long as no soil is with it. I’ve done this. A friend of mine who used to live in Italy brought plants to the UK and was allowed to do this but had to repot them in peat, no soil.

      I think the risk of introducing a potentially invasive plant from further afield is greater and I would not do that plus there is a risk of introducing pests and/or diseases.
       
    • kazzawazza

      kazzawazza Total Gardener

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    • Clare G

      Clare G Gardener

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      I've brought back cuttings from within Europse often enough in the past, inside my sponge bag! The honeysuckle at the end of the garden and an echeveria and a graptopetalum (succulents) on the patio were all originally acquired this way. Also various tradescantias - not sure all of those will have survived the hard winter though.
       
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      • Selleri

        Selleri Gardener

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        Thanks kazzawazza, very informative and interesting! :) Apparently one can bring more or less anything from EU countries, and restrictions seem to follow political rather than geographic borders :scratch: :rolleyespink:

        Within the EU, you can bring in any plant products as long as they are grown in an EU country, are free from pests and diseases and are for your own use or consumption.

        This one made me smile :snorky:

        Certain European and Mediterranean countries include: Albania, Algeria, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canary Islands, Ceuta, Cyprus (the area not effectively controlled by the Government of the Republic of Cyprus),

         
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        • JWK

          JWK Gardener

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          I've brought plants back from within the EU - it's perfectly legal provided you do the same as in the UK, i.e. don't go raiding them from the wild. I bought mine in a local market for a few cents each. For plants and cuttings you need to bring them back in your hand luggage within the cabin because if they go in the hold, which is not heated, anything tender may be killed off.
           
        • Linz

          Linz Total Gardener

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          Brought a load of some sort of pea seed home from one of the Disney parks in Florida last year.. all rotted off :frown: Tried getting my sister to bring some back from her trip the other week but she wouldn't budge..she was fearing customs! :heehee:
           
        • Selleri

          Selleri Gardener

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          Maybe they only grow in Disneyland soil... :snorky:

          [​IMG]



          upload_2018-4-15_12-40-8.jpeg
           
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          • Ian Taylor

            Ian Taylor Total Gardener

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            I've brought seeds and cuttings back from Europe with no problem at customs, I've also had seeds and plants sent to me from outside of Europe mainly America, Japan and Hong Kong, nothing bought on ebay, from clematis friends, never had a problem with customs getting plants in, just costs a fortune in postage
             
          • NigelJ

            NigelJ Total Gardener

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            I have picked up the occasional seed pod when in Nepal, although this is now illegal without a licence. So I have a couple of Sarcococcus hookeriana, Cotoneaster microphylla and some roses of unknown species very thorny, very shrubby and very tough; given they came from a bleak, arid windswept hillside at over 4000m.
             
          • shiney

            shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

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            Things have changed greatly over the years.

            In the old days :old: all live plants, roots, bulbs etc. were banned unless you had a Plant Licence. Mrs Shiney had a licence, had to apply to the Ministry for it, and they then had strict rules on how to go about bringing things in. Anything that was from the wild was restricted, quite a lot of other plants were restricted and some were prohibited.

            Restricted meant that you had to declare them at customs, fill out a list of what they were (their botanical names) and then you could take them with you but had to quarantine them for fourteen days. If you didn't receive a notice from the Ministry by the end of that period you could use them.

            Prohibited meant that you couldn't bring them in even with a Licence. Geraniums came under that prohibition.

            The silly thing was that the customs officers hadn't the faintest idea what the plants were and so, if you wrote down the wrong name for a plant, never checked any you declared as restricted. They just took the completed form from them.

            If you told them all the other plants were not on either list, they believed you. :doh:

            In those days the Green customs barrier used to be very busy and they used to randomly check people coming in. So it could take a while to get through. On the other hand, as we were always going through the Red barrier, we always went through within a minute or so (we had the forms that we had completed beforehand and the Licence all ready for them to look at).
             
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            • strongylodon

              strongylodon Old Member

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              I have brought cuttings and seeds back from most trips abroad with no problem except maybe when it comes to rooting or germinating them!!:biggrin:
               
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              • Redwing

                Redwing Wild Gardener

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                I think what this thread highlights is the danger of bringing potentially invasive species into the UK or even the EU. Follow the rules, folks; there is too much to loose otherwise. This is serious.
                 
                Last edited: Apr 16, 2018

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