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Corkscrew Hazel ( Corylus avellana 'Contorta')

Discussion in 'Trees' started by David E Peacock, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. David E Peacock

    David E Peacock Gardener

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    My Corkscrew Hazel was planted some fourteen years ago and has atained a quite mature height of approx. three metres.
    Then about three years back it developed a couple of suckers (Comon Hazel with a larger leaf) from the base of the tree.
    The suckers were cut back to base but more came back the following spring.
    This years suckers numbered about seven, the longest of which were 2 metres long.
    All have been cut back as flush as possible to the base of the tree. Apart from removing this coming seasons suckers as soon as they develop, I am at a loss as to the best way to sort this problem!

    Comments & advice welcome guys!
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
  2. "M"

    "M" Total Gardener

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    I only have a relatively small one because mine is grown in a pot.

    However, I do know @shiney has a mature corkscrew hazel in his garden, so he may be the one to give you advice based on his experience.
     
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    • shiney

      shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club

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      Thanks @"M" :dbgrtmb:

      It will occur every year :noidea: Just put it down on your calendar as a regular job - just like weeding. We keep the lower part of the tree clear of branches because the trunk looks good and gives us another area to plant flowers. It will also let you see when the suckers are growing.

      I'll post a picture when I can find the time. :blue thumb:
       
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      • David E Peacock

        David E Peacock Gardener

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        Many thanks @shiney

        I thought as much and will include it in my 'Autumn Cleanup'

        One thought has gone through my mind though, and that is could I propagate from one or two of the suckers to achieve a small stand of Common Hazel to coppice each year for use as beanpoles!
        But I have to admit that so far all suckers removed had no sign of rooting on them!

        So perhaps forget this thought and buy a couple of Common Hazel for the beanpole project!
         
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        • Palustris

          Palustris Total Gardener

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          Trouble with removing the suckers is that no matter how close to the point of origin you cut, you still leave enough buds for more suckers to grow. You would need to find the root which is producing them and remove that altogether. Annoying habit though. especially when the suckers are in an incredibly difficult place to reach.
           
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          • Trunky

            Trunky ...who nose about gardening

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            I'd give it a go anyway David. Just try cutting a few lengths at the thicker end of the suckers, about 18ins to 2ft long, find a small patch of ground that you won't need for anything else this summer and simply shove them in the ground and see what happens. Give the patch of ground a good soaking once or twice a week if conditions turn dry in the spring and, with any luck, some of the pieces will take root. You can then lift them and plant them where you want next winter.

            Failing that, hazel grows very easily from seed. Anyone who has a large hazel in or near their garden will tell you they are forever finding hazel seedlings springing up from nuts which have been buried, then lost or forgotten by squirrels. It's probably too late now, but next autumn simply go out and collect a few nuts from the hazels in your your nearest woodland or large hedgerow, plant them and you're almost guaranteed some seedlings the following year.
             
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            • shiney

              shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club

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              We trim the suckers as close to the trunk as possible and have at least twenty each year. The lower branches have been taken off up to a height of about 4ft but the higher branches droop down a bit so it doesn't look quite that much.

              P1300555.JPG

              P1300556.JPG

              The bed underneath is completely full of flowers through spring and summer. You can see it in the distance in this picture.

              P1290108.JPG
               
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