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Echeveria ID and question

Discussion in 'Alpine Gardening' started by norakay, Apr 30, 2016.

  1. norakay

    norakay Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi, everyone. I am having a problem with my Echevaria. First, though, I am wondering if this is indeed an Echeveria (it was not ID'd at the garden centre)? It has bright pink flowers if that helps.

    Second, I am wondering if anybody has any advice for it. In the first picture you can see that it is too top heavy and cannot hold itself up. There is a pencil holding it up in the second picture. Can I chop it in half and re-plant? Is there a way to avoid it getting to tall and top-heavy in the future? It lives indoors and gets as much full sun as Scotland can offer.

    Thanks :)IMG_20160430_084817.jpgIMG_20160430_084858.jpg
     
  2. Tracy_x

    Tracy_x Gardener

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    You can chop it, and will get two plants.

    It can also get new plants by leaves.

    Less water and more sun help them looks tidy.

    Yours already looks good
     
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    • longk

      longk Total Gardener

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      There are so many Echeveria species and cultivars that it's hard to be certain. Do the flowers look a bit like this..............
      [​IMG]

      There are trunk forming Echeveria but my gut feeling is that if it is an Echeveria then it may be struggling for light.
       
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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      I find most echeverias, (that I have tried), eventually form a stem after a couple of years, get out of balance and the pot keeps falling over.
      I usually just re root an offset, or if none avilible cut the stem off, remove a few leaves, let it dry for a couple of days and re root in a fresh pot.
      The old stem then usually puts out lots of new shoots.
       
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        Last edited: Apr 30, 2016
      • Victoria

        Victoria Lover of Exotic Flora

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        I am probably way off base but it reminds me of my Kalanchoe tomentosa. :scratch:
         
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        • pete

          pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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          Well it had me looking at Pachyphytum, it could possibly be some kind of hybrid.
           
        • Redwing

          Redwing Wild Gardener

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          Nora: it looks to me like an echeveria that is not having enough light and too much water. These are deserty plants, meaning they like little water, dry soil, cold nights and high daytime temperatures. Are you growing it on a window sill? They can stand some frost but not too much and as much sun as possible.
           
        • strongylodon

          strongylodon Old Member

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          It could possibly be Graptoveria (Gratopetalum/Echeveria hybrid), which do sometimes find their way on to the market.
           
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          • norakay

            norakay Apprentice Gardener

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            Thanks everyone for your input. Longk, those are what the flowers look like. It is being grown on a windowsill, so I think I will move it to a side table where it gets direct light but won't get as chilly.

            I suppose that I will repot most of it today; but will chop the top off, let it dry for a few days, then add it to the pot with the rest.
             
          • longk

            longk Total Gardener

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            Nooooooooooooo! Unless you live in an igloo it won't be that cold. All that you'll achieve is an even more etiolated plant.
             
          • pete

            pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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            I really dont think there is a light problem, its growing fine, just getting old, and needs a bit of sorting out, if it was growing wild it would probably fall over and re root its self.

            Not come across many plants of this "type" that just stay as a rosette, most start to form stems, get top heavy and fall over.
             
          • pete

            pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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            Obviously a different species but these two pics are of an Echeveria, first one is growing in the garden, the second in a cold frame, (both fairly old plants), so no poor light problems.
            DSC_0002.JPGDSC_0003.JPG

            Having said that, @norakay s plant is obviously a different species, seem to remember having something like it myself in the past, and agree with @strongylodon that its probably a hybrid.
             
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