1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Grafted pepper doing not so well

Discussion in 'Pests, Diseases and Cures' started by Aldo, May 14, 2018.

  1. Aldo

    Aldo Gardener

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2017
    Messages:
    45
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +52
    Hello.

    I know, my posts are all about plants suffering, but I promise, one day I will post an image of an healthy one (taken in my neighbour's garden, presumably, but anyway..).

    So..
    Weeks ago I received three grafted pepper plants from Suttons Seeds, they are called Orange Kiss:
    Pepper Grafted Orange Kiss (3) at Suttons Seeds
    They came as plugs and, having never seen a plug before, I hurried planting them outdoors, because, you know, I am smart like that and unencumbered by gardening knowledge.

    One did not like to be planted vertically, I guess, and after trying hard for two weeks, simply separated from the root stock. I initially blamed some animal but the cut is way too surgical.
    The second one is on top of the planter, severely overcrowded but still alive and seemingly in good health, albeit small.

    The third one is the topic of my question.
    The stem just over the graft seems to have some severe issue, along with one leave. Being the main stem in such bad shape, I guess I can kiss to goodbye to Orange Kiss..

    Still, I would be curious to learn what the problem is.
    Perhaps sun scortching again, like with my poor tomato plant from Ikea?

    Thanks for any advice and sorry for the bad photos, hope they are clear enough :)


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

      Joined:
      Jan 9, 2005
      Messages:
      24,327
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      joinery
      Location:
      Mid Kent
      Ratings:
      +20,213
      Oh no, Think you have planted out too soon.
      Personally I would only bother growing those as greenhouse plants, peppers have never done well for me as outdoor plants, not even when planted out at a good size in June.
      I'm guessing you are in the UK?
       
      • Informative Informative x 2
      • Aldo

        Aldo Gardener

        Joined:
        Nov 25, 2017
        Messages:
        45
        Gender:
        Male
        Ratings:
        +52
        Yes, I live at the outskirts of London, or in Surrey, dependently on the point of view :)

        I see your point about those being greenhouse plants.
        The info on Suttons' website was a bit scarce, to be honest.
        But after asking them for advice about my new tomato plugs, they sent me more detailed guides about grafted plants.
        And those leaflets pretty much say it clearly that both their aubergines and peppers are meant for greenhouses, and that plugs need potting in a sheltered place anyway.

        While I am definetely clueless at gardening and I do not expect them to explain the basics on every product page, to be honest that specific plant could do with a bit more information and perhaps a more realistic photo of it, rather than one sitting cheerfully in a pot surrounded by grass, trained over a fence and bursting with peppers :)

        But then, I guess, they have to keep products attractive. And admittedly the plants looked very healthy on arrival. I should have asked for more guidance before purchasing, rather than after.
        Good to know for the future :)
         
        • Friendly Friendly x 2
        • JWK

          JWK Gardener

          Joined:
          Jun 3, 2008
          Messages:
          18,851
          Gender:
          Male
          Location:
          Surrey
          Ratings:
          +18,204
          Hi Aldo, sorry you have more problems. It's good you are keen and I hope your early failures don't put you off trying. The union point on grafted plants is a weak spot and they do need support especially when young and when outdoors. I've had a gust of wind completely blow the top off one of my grafted tomatoes on the patio in front of my eyes as I was relaxing with a cup of tea.

          As pete says it's a bit too early for them to be outdoors. The damage on your third one could be caused by a slug, another problem for you to contend with. They have been out in force lately looking for tender plants to nibble.
           
          • Informative Informative x 1
          • Aldo

            Aldo Gardener

            Joined:
            Nov 25, 2017
            Messages:
            45
            Gender:
            Male
            Ratings:
            +52

            Thanks John!
            The planter is partially raised, but I see that ants have managed to reach it, so it could be slugs then..
            I will make some taller legs for it, hoping that limits the problem. I have covered all exposed soil with horticultural fleece, in the hope to dissuade pests from exploring, but I guess that they are determined little botherers.
            At first I thought of some nematode I read about, which eats young stems from the inside eventually causing them to break, but I am not sure which plants it affects specifically.

            I read your posts about grafting in other threads and found them very interesting, thanks for sharing all your experiments. While I would not try my hand at it, I can learn a lot about already grafted plants from them.

            Actually, if you can, I have a question.
            Does it make sense to pot grafted plants so that most of the rootstock is covered by soil and can sprout more roots?
            I am thinking particularly about grafted tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers (well, pepper, only one left only I fear), given that is what I am planting this year.
             
          • JWK

            JWK Gardener

            Joined:
            Jun 3, 2008
            Messages:
            18,851
            Gender:
            Male
            Location:
            Surrey
            Ratings:
            +18,204
            Hi Aldo, I have only ever grafted my own tomato plants and yes, they like being buried deep, provided the graft joint is about 1" above the soil surface. Tomatoes will send out new roots on any part of their stems when buried, which is good.

            I haven't tried deep planting peppers, my gut feel is that they shouldn't be any deeper than when you bought them. Cucumbers certainly don't like being buried any deeper and are very temperamental about over/under watering and cold.
             
            • Informative Informative x 1
            • pete

              pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

              Joined:
              Jan 9, 2005
              Messages:
              24,327
              Gender:
              Male
              Occupation:
              joinery
              Location:
              Mid Kent
              Ratings:
              +20,213
              @Aldo , dont give up, put it down to experience, I know it costs money though.
              As you say, those that sell plants will tend to show you what they think you want to see.
              Be wary of anything that looks too good to be true, like a photo of a plant against a fence with 12 ripe peppers on it,:biggrin:, its not likely to happen in the real world.:frown:

              Suttons used to be better than that, maybe they have employed someone from Thompson and Morgan, or J. Parkers, the kings of misleading pictures.;)

              But most are jumping on the bandwagon these days.
               
              • Friendly Friendly x 1
              • Aldo

                Aldo Gardener

                Joined:
                Nov 25, 2017
                Messages:
                45
                Gender:
                Male
                Ratings:
                +52
                Thanks!
                I was thinking of planting the cucumbers in self watering baskets (acqua lock), but if they do not take well to shifts in humidity and temperature, maybe I should try something more reliable and portable, if I realise the position is not good.
                I might try and cobble up self-watering pots with two buckets stacked, which seems to be popular online. They look quite awful, but dead plants do not look very pretty either..
                 
                • Like Like x 1
                • Aldo

                  Aldo Gardener

                  Joined:
                  Nov 25, 2017
                  Messages:
                  45
                  Gender:
                  Male
                  Ratings:
                  +52
                  Thanks for the encouragement Pete, much appreciated!
                  It does cost money, it is true, but it is also my fault for reading advertising blurbs and taking them at face value, I guess :)
                  I think, with online sales and all of that, most companies are trying to fish for impulse buyers.
                  The fact that they pretty much have one single description for all the grafted plants (disease resistance, higher productivity, plant it right in the soil, it will make you tea) should have made me cautious.

                  But then, it is all experience and I am enjoying learning a bit more, even if through mistakes.
                  And I am very lucky to have found this forum, honestly.
                   
                  • Friendly Friendly x 2
                  • JWK

                    JWK Gardener

                    Joined:
                    Jun 3, 2008
                    Messages:
                    18,851
                    Gender:
                    Male
                    Location:
                    Surrey
                    Ratings:
                    +18,204
                    I still keep falling for them, even after years of learning the hard way and telling myself to only buy what I carefully research and plan.
                     
                    • Like Like x 2
                    • Aldo

                      Aldo Gardener

                      Joined:
                      Nov 25, 2017
                      Messages:
                      45
                      Gender:
                      Male
                      Ratings:
                      +52
                      Well, we are human after all, and advertisers specialize on selling dreams to humans :)

                      I think I'll try and place the top section of plastic bottles on the two surviving peppers for a few days, and see if that makes them a bit more confortable.
                      Not quite a green house but perhaps it will help them grow a bit more.

                      I am tempted to also put a tube around the damaged stem, and cover it in soil. That would give it more support and perhaps lead the steam to develop more roots (or perhaps peppers are not like tomatoes, and will not sprout more roots from the stem, not sure).
                       
                      • Like Like x 1

                      Share This Page