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Growing roses

Discussion in 'Roses' started by Greg C, Feb 19, 2018.

  1. Greg C

    Greg C Gardener

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    Ok, when I signed up last I did warn there would be a lot of questions. So here goes :snorky:

    I want to plant a rose bush. I have never planted one before, but my wife loves them so she will get one for her birthday. But I have no idea where to start. It seems that it is best to buy them as a bare root. But this is where I have some questions:
    1. How long do they take to establish? I assume it will be a good year or two before they flower?
    2. Can they be planted in large pots or are they best in the ground?
    3. Is it too late to plant one for this coming season (I don't quite get the dormant stage over winter and when that ends...bearing in mind I'm in Scotland so spring only really springs late April).

    Any other tips to make it work would be greatly appreciated :autlvs:
     
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    • Clare G

      Clare G Gardener

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      Good idea Greg - that will be a lovely present! :biggrin:

      1. You should get some flowers the first year - more maybe if you go for a container rather than a bareroot rose

      2. They do prefer being in the ground really but smaller varieties in particular can do well in pots - look out for varieties described as 'patio roses'.

      3. You should still be fine to put in bareroot roses, especially in Scotland. (Would be fine even here in London right now, the weather's been so cold.) My personal preference is always to put bareroot shrubs in during the autumn to give the roots more time to establish, but now is still good.

      The advantage of bareroot roses is that they are cheaper, and you get a bigger choice of varieties. On the other hand container roses can be planted at any time and even purchased (later in the year) in bloom.

      There is so much choice that you will be sure to find something to suit your garden and your wife's tastes. You can probably even find one with her name! The David Austin website is as good a place as any to start browsing - it gives good advice on planting and maintenance too.
      David Austin Roses - Bare root roses, Container roses, English Roses, Climbers, Ramblers - Buy online
       
    • wiseowl

      wiseowl Friendly Owl Admin Staff Member

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      Good afternoon @Greg C I am at present still updating this rose Thread but it should answer some of your questions:smile:

      EVERYTHING APPERTAINING TO ROSES

      GROWING ROSES IN CONTAINERS
      Only a few roses are tolerant of being grown in containers, as roses generally have long shallow roots for anchoring the plant and searching out moisture and nutrients. As long as deep containers are chosen, a good show of blooms should be achieved.

      The best roses for growing in containers are the patio and miniature types, which can be grown in fairly small but deep pots 23-35cm (9-14in) deep. You could also try growing less vigorous, more compact ground cover and climbing roses, but use larger containers with a minimum depth of 30-45cm (12-18in).

      The best compost to use is a loam-based John Innes No 3 to which 10 to 20 percent multi-purpose compost or very well-rotted manure may be added for richness. Position the container before filling with compost as it may be too heavy to move once planted up.

      Roses love sunshine and should receive sun for at least half the day. However it is important that container-grown plants do not dry out or they will become prone to powdery mildew. If possible position the container so that it is shaded for part of the day, leaving the plant itself in full sun.

      Ideally pot up plants in November using bare-root plants, but container-grown plants will do as well, and can be potted up any time between October and April.

      Drainage: Keep the pots raised on feet and add a drainage layer of gravel at the bottom to ensure good winter drainage
      Feeding: Roses use up food reserves quickly and grow better if top-dressed each spring with a granular rose fertiliser. Additional feeding may be required as per the manufacturer's recommendations. Avoid feeding after August as soft growth may be damaged by cold winters
      Mulching: Mulch with a 5cm (2in) top-dressing of well-rotted garden compost or manure to help retain moisture and enrich the compost
      Top-dressing: Every second year, remove the top 5cm (2in) of compost and replace with a fresh layer

      The Potted/Container Rose

      Roses were first sold in pots, as were most plants, to fulfil the demands of the instant gardener but the traditional method of supply is as bare root plants in the winter months, often by mail order. There is little between them as far as the ultimate plant is concerned but there are advantages and disadvantages to both.


      As already mentioned, a container rose can be purchased at any time of year (although there are more available in the summer months for various reasons). The advantage of buying a rose in a pot is that you can select the plant yourself during a visit to a nursery oo garden centre. Remember though that the range will be smaller than the range available in grower’s catalogues. A potted rose planted during the summer months will require much more watering than a bare root rose planted in the previous autumn. So tragic to go away on holiday leaving a beautiful new rose only to find it withered or even dead on return.

      Bare root roses can be chosen and ordered at any time of the year, though early in the summer is best to ensure that your choice is secured (growers tally orders and the roses available as the orders arrive on a first come first served basis). However they will only ever arrive in their dormant season, usually between the months of October and March. Therefore the first flowers will not be seen until the following year. Obviously they are live plants so need fairly immediate treatment upon arrival. This can be difficult in times of heavy frost or snow. (It is prudent to prepare an area in which to heel in the roses -more on this later). Bare root plants do tend to transplant more easily and have a settling in period before they are required to grow or flower. I would never advise buying a pre-packed rose from a supermarket for you have no idea how long they have been packaged and may well have dried out

      Advantages of Bare-root plants:
      • You pay less for the same size plants.
      • You can carry and plant them easily.
      • You only plant them in winter, so they need less maintenance after planting. The ground is naturally wet for their first few months.
      • You get the biggest selection: Many Roses are not sold pot-grown.
      • They are "asleep" in winter - this is the best time to transplant any Rose

      • Advantages of Pot Grown plants
      • Pot grown plants can be delivered & planted all year round

      POTS

      Terracotta is made from clay – which is just a kind of soil – that is turned on a wheel and fired in a kiln. The hotter the firing, the more frost-resistant it will be. This is important because terracotta can crack and flake in very cold weather because the pots absorb water which then expands as it freezes and something has to give.Opt for a pot that provides good drainage. Plastic and clay pots with holes at the bottom offer better drainage ,and I always use John Innes No3 to plant my Rose
      Place a one-inch layer of medium-sized bark chips or gravel over the bottom of the container. The chips or stones should be larger than any holes in the bottom of the pot to prevent them from falling through. This layer provides your roses with additional drainage.
      Loosely pack the soil into the pot. Do not pack too tightly, as your rose needs room to breathe.
      Increase the nutrient level by mixing a cup of bonemeal into the soil. Roses need a lot of nutrients, and bonemeal can provide the fertile conditions your roses need to produce many blooms.Place the rose into the soil. If working with a bare-root rose, spread the roots out comfortably. Rose roots need ample room to spread out horizontally.
      Fill in the area around the rose with more soil. Gently press the soil around the stems. The surface of the soil should match the place where the roots and rose plant meet.The container should be filled so that the soil almost comes to the top. If the rose is too deep in the container, pull it out of the soil and add more to the bottom of the pot.Water until well saturated. Even though root rot does pose a threat to roses, these flowers also need plenty of moist soil to survive.Position the container in a location that receives full sun. Roses need at least 6 hours of sun daily to thrive.
       
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      • Greg C

        Greg C Gardener

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        Thanks Clare G and wiseowl. Very helpful info from both of you. I have bought 2 bare roots (couldn't find one with my wife's name - great idea Clare G, but found one called Birthday Girl .... close enough :smile:)
        I'll let you know how I get on and will definitely be referring to the rose Thread wiseowl.
         
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        • wiseowl

          wiseowl Friendly Owl Admin Staff Member

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          You are most welcome @Greg C my friend its an excellent choice,I have the Rose "Birthday Girl" in my collection:smile:
           
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          • Greg C

            Greg C Gardener

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            Ok, another rose question :help:
            My bare root roses arrived today. They look pretty good (as good as roots can look). I obviously need to plant them I take it I need to plant them into the ground right away (while dormant)? Or can I keep them in a bucket until the weekend?
             
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            • wiseowl

              wiseowl Friendly Owl Admin Staff Member

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              Hi @Greg C my friend you can keep them in a bucket until the weekend :smile:
               
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              • Greg C

                Greg C Gardener

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                Thanks wiseowl :)
                 
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                • Greg C

                  Greg C Gardener

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                  Soooooo....the roses are in! A week before the snow arrived! I made some covers out of wire and plastic to try keep the snow off them as they were only in the ground 4 days before they snow landed.
                  Now here is another question. My wife has this small indoor rose plant. Can this be planted in the garden, or would it not survive. It is doing quite well in the pot, although I am worried the pot is a bit small. Should I repot it, or plant it in the garden?
                   

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