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Hard pruning a dracaena?

Discussion in 'Other Plants' started by nikirushka, Nov 12, 2017.

  1. nikirushka

    nikirushka Gardener

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    My dracaena is a good 4ft tall now, a single stem with decent growth on top but, it's too tall for anywhere with decent light!

    I've half a mind to just chop it off way down near the base and hope! Would it sprout new side shoots if I did that? It's never so much as tried to before but I'm very much at the point where I don't want to rehome it (sentimental value) but it's becoming difficult to care for.

    I could also repot the top bit if I did that and if I did, how much stem would I need to leave? The stem currently is nearly 3ft of the plant so I've got plenty of it to leave!
     
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    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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      Never tried it, is it one of those spindly kinds?:smile:
      I'd go for it, leave some stem, it's likely to produce a couple of new stems I'm thinking.
      Try rooting the top part after letting the cut callous over for a couple of days.

      Totally wrong time of the year to be doing this though.:biggrin:
       
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      • strongylodon

        strongylodon Old Member

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        I guess it is D marginata, (the spindly one) it may not look much until new growth has appeared which might not be until later next year. Rooting Dracaena tops isn't easy as they need bottom heat, a heated prop would make it easier but as Pete says, not really the right time of year.
         
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        • "M"

          "M" Total Gardener

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          Ok :scratch:
          Ok :scratch: ... gosh it's like trying to get blood from a stone from you guys sometimes :doh: :heehee:

          Is Spring the right time of year? :)
           
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          • Loofah

            Loofah Well used member

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            I've never had any issues doing this year-round. Any time mine gets to high I lop off a chunk and stuff the bit I chopped off into the pot next to the plant. It gives a tiered planting.
            The stump will take some time but probably shoot out 2-3 new leafy bits
             
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            • Linz

              Linz Total Gardener

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              Was actually looking at mine the other day wondering what to do with it.. thanks for the question @nikirushka and thanks for the replies :)
              I just googled to find which variety I have (it's marginata) and I also found they're toxic to cats..and as I'm typing this, one cat is happily sleeping next to it on the windowsill :th scifD36: :scratch:
               
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              • "M"

                "M" Total Gardener

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                Sleeping is ok, I think. Just don't let the cat eat it ;)
                 
              • nikirushka

                nikirushka Gardener

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                It's this one, I think it is marginata. It's gone a bit too long between waterings so it's a bit droopy, I've just given it a good drink! The fern is fake btw, I just had to put something plant-like in the empty space between the leaves and the pot :snorky:
                2017-11-14 19.26.42.jpg

                I don't mind waiting til spring to prune, that's no biggy although my house is tropical year-round (seriously, it's always 23-25C in here) so I'm not sure it would notice the seasons that much!
                 
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                • pete

                  pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                  Plants, even house plants notice day length and although tropical plants are used to shorter days than we get during summer they are also used to much longer days than we get mid winter.
                  Normal household lighting is unlikely to make up for the short day length.
                   
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