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Himalayan honeysuckle

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by mrsduffy82, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. mrsduffy82

    mrsduffy82 Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi
    First off, I'm very much the beginner gardener.
    I have a himalayan honeysuckle that in the 5 years I've lived in this house I've never touched. I didn't even know what it was until a few months ago. It's very leggy and has no foliage until about 5 feet up. Directly in front of it is what I believe to be a 'red robin' photinia. It's pretty big and blocks the sun from getting to the himalayan honeysuckle, which I assume is why its so leggy. We did take the photinia back to about 5 feet tall from around 8 feet last spring.
    I've read that himalayan honeysuckle can be cut back as far as leaving only 6 inches above the ground, but considering the photinia is so dominating, would this be too drastic? Would my best option be to give the himalayan honeysuckle a good cut but also to try to move it so its gets more sunlight?
     
  2. CanadianLori

    CanadianLori Total Gardener

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    Welcome to the forum!

    I don't know the answer but I'm sure someone who knows will come along and help out :)
     
  3. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    I tend to hack mine back to almost ground level each year.
    I'd not try moving it if it's been there 5 yrs plus.:smile:
     
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    • mrsduffy82

      mrsduffy82 Apprentice Gardener

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      Thank you @pete, when is the best time of year to cut it back?
       
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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      Now would be good.;)
       
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      • Bilbo675

        Bilbo675 Total Gardener

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        The general rule with them is to cut back hard in the same way as Pete mentioned, down to about 6 inches, this will encourage a flush of new growth.

        Another option is removing the weak and spindly 'canes', leaving a few stronger ones, this is less drastic but still tidies the shrub an encourages new growth from the base ;)
         
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        • Mowerman

          Mowerman Gardener

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          Was reading an RHS book this morning and it suggested exactly as @pete and @Bilbo675 confirmed doing, and at this time of year. It also mentioned they are 'practically indestructable' so don't worry that you'll be harming them.
           
        • mrsduffy82

          mrsduffy82 Apprentice Gardener

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          Thank you for all of your help. I'll get out there and get cutting.
           
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          • redstar

            redstar Total Gardener

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          • Loofah

            Loofah Well used member

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            They also self seed quite freely so you'll always have a backup
             
          • Bilbo675

            Bilbo675 Total Gardener

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            "They also self seed quite freely so you'll always have a backup"

            Easy from cuttings too ;)
             
          • Mowerman

            Mowerman Gardener

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            Many people say it's somewhat a thug of a plant and can overtake gardens, but have yet to see this happen, even where its been establlished for many years.

            Maybe the heavy clay soil around here keeps it subdued!?! :scratch:
             

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