1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Please note - to keep GC running smoothly, from time to time the staff will have to close a long thread and continue it in a new thread. You too can do your bit to help - if you have a long running PM conversation, please terminate the conversation and start a new conversation. For further information, please contact a member of the staff team.
    Dismiss Notice

Himalayan honeysuckle

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by mrsduffy82, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. mrsduffy82

    mrsduffy82 Apprentice Gardener

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +1
    Hi
    First off, I'm very much the beginner gardener.
    I have a himalayan honeysuckle that in the 5 years I've lived in this house I've never touched. I didn't even know what it was until a few months ago. It's very leggy and has no foliage until about 5 feet up. Directly in front of it is what I believe to be a 'red robin' photinia. It's pretty big and blocks the sun from getting to the himalayan honeysuckle, which I assume is why its so leggy. We did take the photinia back to about 5 feet tall from around 8 feet last spring.
    I've read that himalayan honeysuckle can be cut back as far as leaving only 6 inches above the ground, but considering the photinia is so dominating, would this be too drastic? Would my best option be to give the himalayan honeysuckle a good cut but also to try to move it so its gets more sunlight?
     
  2. CanadianLori

    CanadianLori Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2015
    Messages:
    2,439
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Sweaty Betty
    Location:
    Ontario zone 6a
    Ratings:
    +6,038
    Welcome to the forum!

    I don't know the answer but I'm sure someone who knows will come along and help out :)
     
  3. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Messages:
    23,189
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    joinery
    Location:
    Mid Kent
    Ratings:
    +17,350
    I tend to hack mine back to almost ground level each year.
    I'd not try moving it if it's been there 5 yrs plus.:smile:
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • mrsduffy82

      mrsduffy82 Apprentice Gardener

      Joined:
      Mar 18, 2017
      Messages:
      3
      Gender:
      Female
      Ratings:
      +1
      Thank you @pete, when is the best time of year to cut it back?
       
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

      Joined:
      Jan 9, 2005
      Messages:
      23,189
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      joinery
      Location:
      Mid Kent
      Ratings:
      +17,350
      Now would be good.;)
       
      • Agree Agree x 2
      • Bilbo675

        Bilbo675 Total Gardener

        Joined:
        Mar 15, 2011
        Messages:
        4,460
        Gender:
        Male
        Occupation:
        Gardener & Plant Sales
        Location:
        South Derbyshire
        Ratings:
        +6,469
        The general rule with them is to cut back hard in the same way as Pete mentioned, down to about 6 inches, this will encourage a flush of new growth.

        Another option is removing the weak and spindly 'canes', leaving a few stronger ones, this is less drastic but still tidies the shrub an encourages new growth from the base ;)
         
        • Agree Agree x 1
        • Mowerman

          Mowerman Gardener

          Joined:
          Jul 26, 2015
          Messages:
          439
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +596
          Was reading an RHS book this morning and it suggested exactly as @pete and @Bilbo675 confirmed doing, and at this time of year. It also mentioned they are 'practically indestructable' so don't worry that you'll be harming them.
           
        • mrsduffy82

          mrsduffy82 Apprentice Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 18, 2017
          Messages:
          3
          Gender:
          Female
          Ratings:
          +1
          Thank you for all of your help. I'll get out there and get cutting.
           
          • Like Like x 1
          • redstar

            redstar Total Gardener

            Joined:
            Aug 6, 2008
            Messages:
            5,077
            Gender:
            Female
            Occupation:
            Full time-Service Director -Human Services.
            Location:
            Chester County, PA, USA, Plant zone 4 & 5
            Ratings:
            +5,487
          • Loofah

            Loofah Well used member

            Joined:
            Feb 20, 2008
            Messages:
            4,365
            Gender:
            Male
            Occupation:
            Business operations specialist
            Location:
            Guildford
            Ratings:
            +4,330
            They also self seed quite freely so you'll always have a backup
             
          • Bilbo675

            Bilbo675 Total Gardener

            Joined:
            Mar 15, 2011
            Messages:
            4,460
            Gender:
            Male
            Occupation:
            Gardener & Plant Sales
            Location:
            South Derbyshire
            Ratings:
            +6,469
            "They also self seed quite freely so you'll always have a backup"

            Easy from cuttings too ;)
             
          • Mowerman

            Mowerman Gardener

            Joined:
            Jul 26, 2015
            Messages:
            439
            Gender:
            Male
            Ratings:
            +596
            Many people say it's somewhat a thug of a plant and can overtake gardens, but have yet to see this happen, even where its been establlished for many years.

            Maybe the heavy clay soil around here keeps it subdued!?! :scratch:
             

          Share This Page