1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. November Photo Comp is now open with a great new theme.! Come and join in.
    Dismiss Notice

How to remove a water butt?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by Monty33, Nov 6, 2018.

  1. Monty33

    Monty33 Gardener

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Ratings:
    +1
    Perhaps this doesn't appear in the green spirit of things but I've moved into a property with 4 and one is by the front door which I'd like to remove.

    The downpipe is metal and has a diverter section installed, the pipe is so rigid I'm not sure how I'd get it out and replace with a solid connector. Is this my only option or can I simply plug the hole and the downpipe function as normal? Struggling to find any such suitable plug!
     
  2. Scrungee

    Scrungee Well known for it

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Messages:
    13,821
    Location:
    Central England on heavy clay soil
    Ratings:
    +22,295
    Normally a section will have been cut out to install the diverter, meaning you probably need to replace the upper or lower sections with a longer length, plus you will need a connector to join it to the old pipe. You could add a shorter length to fill the gap, but you would need 2 connectors and would also need to buy a length of pipe.

    What sort of metal pipe is it? If cast iron it will be a very expensive job. On our Victorian house we have some old thin galvanised steel downpipes and gutters, some of which were rotten and I replaced with black uPVC. If you wish to preserve the appearance of the pipe, you may find it difficult to get additional pipe and connectors.

    If you cut off the 'overflow' and leave the remainder insitu, you will create a sort of internal trap that would stay full of water.

    A picture would help.

    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Monty33

      Monty33 Gardener

      Joined:
      May 23, 2012
      Messages:
      34
      Gender:
      Male
      Location:
      Hampshire
      Ratings:
      +1
      Thanks @Scrungee, that picture has improved my understanding of how it works and cleared up that removal is the preferable option.

      Thankfully it's not cast iron but galvanised steel or aluminium (how do I tell?), perhaps the simplest option is to replace from the diverter to ground level with one length of pipe using one connector. However I'm only finding it in 3m length and don't know how I'd cut it to the required length.

      Additionally it's so tightly fitter from roof to ground I'm not even sure how to dismantle it at this point!
       
      Last edited: Nov 6, 2018
    • Scrungee

      Scrungee Well known for it

      Joined:
      Dec 5, 2010
      Messages:
      13,821
      Location:
      Central England on heavy clay soil
      Ratings:
      +22,295
      Have you got a magnet?
       
    • Monty33

      Monty33 Gardener

      Joined:
      May 23, 2012
      Messages:
      34
      Gender:
      Male
      Location:
      Hampshire
      Ratings:
      +1
      That is a rather obvious solution now you've mentioned it!! So the answer is aluminum according to the disinterested magnet.

      So the next question is how on earth do I get it apart, firstly to measure the diameter and secondly to remove the diverter. It's fitted so tightly from ground to gutter there is no lateral give at all. Hmmmmm
       
    • Scrungee

      Scrungee Well known for it

      Joined:
      Dec 5, 2010
      Messages:
      13,821
      Location:
      Central England on heavy clay soil
      Ratings:
      +22,295
      You need to remove the outlet in the guttering above to be able to lift the downpipe.
       

    Share This Page