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Lemons and roses

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by 2nd_bassoon, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. 2nd_bassoon

    2nd_bassoon Gardener

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    Birthday season in our house and my parents have gifted us both with plants - a lemon tree for Mr Bassoon and a rose ("Warm Welcome") for me. Both lovely, but I have questions!

    Does anyone have experience of growing/caring for a lemon tree? We don't have a greenhouse so it's currently sitting in the bay window in the living room, which gets reasonable light but I'm worried might be too warm all winter long. At the moment it's more of a bush than a tree, is there any particular pruning I should be doing to help it grow into a more tree-like shape?

    Regarding the rose, I believe it is a minature climber. I know roses in general don't like pots but do the minatures fare better? I don't have anywhere obvious to plant a climber in the garden at present, and as we rent I would like the option to take it with me one day.
     
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    • ARMANDII

      ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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      Hi 2B, if the pot is fairly big then the answer is yes. Feed it with Tomato Feed say once every 3 weeks when it starts growth next year and it should be fine. You could get special rose feed but, to be honest, a dose of Miracle Grow, every now and then, will do just to keep it happy.

      Warm Welcome

      [​IMG]





      A small patio climbing rose. Clusters of slightly fragrant semi-double blooms, orange-red in colour are produced repeatedly throughout the summer into the autumn. Foliage is small, red when young maturing to dark green and semi-glossy. Ideal for growing in a large pot up a trellis. Easy to train with flexible shoots. Ideal gift for someone in their new home. Hardy. Good disease resistance. Grows to 250cm in height.

      So Lemon and roses were the theme.........reminds me of the rose "Orange and Lemon"
      upload_2017-11-13_20-59-57.jpeg
       
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      • "M"

        "M" Total Gardener

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        Sorry, no advice, but ...


        ... sending you both :bdbanner: wishes :happydan:

        :bdcake:
         
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        • noisette47

          noisette47 Total Gardener

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          I grow citrus trees in pots :) You're spot on about them preferring cool conditions in winter. Frost-free, yes, and as much light as possible. Very little water and ALWAYS raise the pot up out of it's saucer so the tree isn't sitting with wet roots. Would a blowaway plastic greenhouse be feasible? I keep my trees in one of those tucked under the overhanging roof and they do much better than when I used to swathe them individually in fleece, not to mention the hassle of unwrapping them too soon in Spring and having to wrap them up again in a hurry 'cos of false starts :wallbanging: For pruning, if you want a standard tree, you need to select the strongest, straightest stem and ruthlessly chop all the others out. Tie-in the remaining one to a cane to keep it straight and once it's at the height you want it, pinch out the tip. You'll need to rub out all the little shoots that regularly appear. Patience required:)
           
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          • 2nd_bassoon

            2nd_bassoon Gardener

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            Thanks all. The local garden centre has a Christmas market this weekend so I'll combine that with some pot shopping :)

            That's good to know @noisette47 , most places online suggest conservatories or greenhouses, neither of which I can provide! This year it might just be small enough to fit in the coldframe, will do some measuring tomorrow... How quick/slow do they grow?
             
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            • noisette47

              noisette47 Total Gardener

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              They tend to just tick over in the winter if kept on the dry side. When the weather warms up and you start watering and feeding regularly, they get going. Depends on the variety, but it'll take at least a couple of years to form a standard, more if you want a tall one.
               
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