1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Need help/advice/clarity please

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by "M", Mar 11, 2018.

  1. "M"

    "M" Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2012
    Messages:
    18,608
    Location:
    The Garden of England
    Ratings:
    +31,823
    Big "ask" I know!

    Today, as a gift, I received a basket of plants; a "display" of plants!
    At once, I recognised:
    • 1 x blue hydrangea (lacecap)
    • 1 x white rhododendron
    • 1 x white begonia
    • 1 x white kalanchoe
    • 1 x something unidentifiable (to me!)
    Now, my first thought was: aha! a need for ericaceous compost! :dbgrtmb: (thinking rhodo and hydrangea here ;) ).
    Next thought: what numpty put these plants together? :scratch: :dunno: There are contradictions in terms here! Hydrangeas (I know!) need a moist habit; Kalanchoe need a drier habitat; rhodo's I haven't a clue other than ericaceous! and begonia lurve shade! :dunno:

    My first "complaint" is ... as was soon most obvious ... all those plants had been PLOPPED - yes, plopped - into a "basket" to make a "display" (grr!) No mistaking the pot bound plants pushed into a basket of compost! The hydrangea flowers were simply gasping for water! :nonofinger:

    So: sent Mr "M" out to get some ericaceous compost, and some pots, with a view to planting them up individually for an increased chance of survival. Good so far? :dunno:

    Ok.

    Then I read the label of this "deluxe" arrangement: indoor use only! :scratch:

    I admit: I'm totally thrown here! Since when were hydrangeas "indoor" plants? :dunno:
    Sort of guessed from Lonk's posts that Kalanchoe might be indoors only?
    Rhodo's? Aren't they acid loving outdoors? :dunno:
    What about the begonia? :scratch:

    I really think this "arrangement" has been plopped together to earn a bit coin chez supermarket. However, I would love to salvage what I can to grow on.

    Does anyone have any idea how I could salvage this display so I could enjoy it for more then a day or two?

    TIA :thumbsup:
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Victoria

      Victoria Lover of Exotic Flora

      Joined:
      Jun 9, 2006
      Messages:
      17,515
      Occupation:
      Lady of Leisure
      Location:
      Portugal
      Ratings:
      +4,070
      Firstly, what a lovely gift.

      Secondly, I would immediately dismantle the arrangement treat each plant individually for their specific requirements ... and enjoy them all for their unique beauty.

      I am sure others will come along and give you detailed instructions ... but please let us know how everything fares (with photos).


      You can do it!
       
      • Like Like x 3
      • Agree Agree x 1
      • Friendly Friendly x 1
      • "M"

        "M" Total Gardener

        Joined:
        Aug 11, 2012
        Messages:
        18,608
        Location:
        The Garden of England
        Ratings:
        +31,823
        Indeed! I was so delighted. :wub2:

        Yup, that was my thought too. :thumbsup: I now have some ericaceous compost for the blue hydrangea and rhodo plus pots to plant them up into. Not so convinced the begonia and kalanchoe need that type of compost, but have some MPC to hand, just in case ;)
        Aww! Thank you!!!!!! :wub2: Those words of encouragement are worth so much to me and I thank you, most kindly, for them!
         
        • Like Like x 2
        • Friendly Friendly x 1
        • Sheal

          Sheal Total Gardener

          Joined:
          Feb 2, 2011
          Messages:
          28,089
          Gender:
          Female
          Location:
          Inverness-Shire, Scotland
          Ratings:
          +31,292
          The Hydrangea will grow just about anywhere in any soil @"M". They're often seen in coastal positions in sandy soil. The Rhodo is the same family as the Azalea, again fairly adaptable. I had one happily growing in sandy soil but in semi-shade.

          The begonia better in a pot or basket. I can't help with the Kalanchoe but perhaps we can identify the anonymous one for you from a picture. :)
           
          • Like Like x 4
          • Friendly Friendly x 1
          • KFF

            KFF Total Gardener

            Joined:
            May 30, 2017
            Messages:
            2,607
            Gender:
            Male
            Location:
            Worcestershire
            Ratings:
            +2,783
            @"M" , Hydrangeas and small Rhodo's have been grown as indoor flowering plants since the Victorian era . The idea is to bring them on early to provide Spring flowering pot plants and then plant them out later in the year. Begonias will do well in shade or sun.

            As these have been forced for flowering none would survive outdoors now, the growth will be too soft. Put them somewhere coolish in bright light and they'll be fine .

            I really think you're overthinking the situation here. Enjoy them and plant them out later.
             
            • Like Like x 4
            • Informative Informative x 1
            • Mike Allen

              Mike Allen Gardener

              Joined:
              Jan 4, 2014
              Messages:
              223
              Gender:
              Male
              Ratings:
              +460
              Nice gift "M" Pleasing to the eye and certainly not cheap! Obviously someone likes you and knows you love plants.
              A couple of thoughts rush through my brain. (Nothing to stop them. My brain equals an open expance). Forgive me but this reminds me of a family friend of years past. She had been for a EEC, because of continual headaches. So we asked her the results. Oh! they never found anything!!!!!! Ooops.
              Next. What is a house plant. I always consider this a contradiction of terms. I wonder if anyone has grown a bonsia Giant Redwood.

              Serously. Sadly IMO plants and other natural forms of life are so often mistreated, such as cramming lots of plants into a small space, simply to catch the eye. This has become a regular thing in the commercial world of horticulture. Sit back and enjoy your arrangement. When you start to see plants slowing down etc, then seperate them. Renove dead/dying blooms. Don't be in too much of a hurry to repot etc. Take care and enjoy.
               
              • Like Like x 3
              • PaulB3

                PaulB3 Gardener

                Joined:
                Jul 21, 2017
                Messages:
                64
                Gender:
                Male
                Occupation:
                Professional Gardener
                Location:
                Lincolnshire UK
                Ratings:
                +170
                One word of caution here ; looks like the bitter easterly is set to return this weekend . Probably your plants have become used to an 'inside' environment . I'd keep them somewhere frost-free until the 'Minibeast from the East' clears off !
                 
                • Like Like x 2
                • pete

                  pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

                  Joined:
                  Jan 9, 2005
                  Messages:
                  24,745
                  Gender:
                  Male
                  Occupation:
                  joinery
                  Location:
                  Mid Kent
                  Ratings:
                  +21,282
                  I think treating each plant individually is the way to go, although I would guess that a far few would just discard the whole thing once it started to look bad.
                  These things are really not meant to be long term, just an arrangement, in a similar way to cut flowers.

                  You need to repot and acclimatise all the different plants in question.
                  Just a thought on the Rhodo, it might well be indica which is really best kept as a pot plant and will get bigger each year.
                  Never thought of Hydrangeas as houseplants, but then why not I guess.

                  Begonias, there are lots of different types, without a pic, no way of saying.

                  Unidentifiables, we all like those :biggrin:
                   
                  • Like Like x 3
                  • "M"

                    "M" Total Gardener

                    Joined:
                    Aug 11, 2012
                    Messages:
                    18,608
                    Location:
                    The Garden of England
                    Ratings:
                    +31,823
                    Thank you all for the kind advice.

                    The only photos I have are the ones I took on my phone when I was first presented with it, so, apologies in advance for the rubbish pix :heehee:

                    This is the arrangement

                    20180311_081215 (722x1024).jpg

                    This is what I think is a Rhodo

                    20180311_090306 (576x1024).jpg

                    and one showing the leaf

                    20180311_090316 (576x1024).jpg

                    The begonia flower

                    20180311_090354 (576x1024).jpg

                    What I think is the kalanchoe (the bare earth is where the hydrangea popped out :oops: )

                    20180311_090720 (576x1024) (2).jpg

                    This is the one I cannot identify; all leaf no bloom.

                    20180311_090701 (576x1024).jpg


                    Thank you :thumbsup:
                     
                    • Like Like x 3
                    • silu

                      silu gardening easy...hmmm

                      Joined:
                      Oct 20, 2010
                      Messages:
                      3,376
                      Gender:
                      Female
                      Location:
                      Igloo
                      Ratings:
                      +7,285
                      Pretty sure it's a dwarf Azalea @"M". Probably deciduous as it doesn't have the thick waxy leaves of evergreen types. These types do not grow well with me as it's too cold here apart from the odd variety which are hardy souls. Yes to acid conditions, they do fine in pots in plenty of sun but must be kept well watered. Great if you could add some leaf mold to the growing medium or peat failing that. I know I should know what the leaves are as sure I've seen them before but can't think. Something tells me they might be of the tender variety but could well be wrong. Need Silver Surfer to do her usual amazing identifications!
                      Lovely present and can see why you would want to try and keep the plants going.
                       
                      • Like Like x 2
                      • Informative Informative x 1
                      • Clare G

                        Clare G Gardener

                        Joined:
                        Mar 29, 2017
                        Messages:
                        239
                        Gender:
                        Female
                        Location:
                        London UK
                        Ratings:
                        +605
                        • Like Like x 2
                        • Agree Agree x 2
                        • Loki

                          Loki Super Gardener

                          Joined:
                          May 3, 2015
                          Messages:
                          974
                          Gender:
                          Female
                          Location:
                          Middlesbrough
                          Ratings:
                          +2,402
                          Years ago I worked in Sainsbury's on the plant section, during that time they brought in sell by dates on them! :rolleyespink: I was expected to throw out healthy rubber, yucca plants and the like because they where out of date :doh::mute:
                           
                          • Friendly Friendly x 1
                          • pete

                            pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

                            Joined:
                            Jan 9, 2005
                            Messages:
                            24,745
                            Gender:
                            Male
                            Occupation:
                            joinery
                            Location:
                            Mid Kent
                            Ratings:
                            +21,282
                            Pretty sure the Rhodo is one of these, naming is getting confusing these days as they have fairly recently changed it, but to us old lot its an indoor azalea.
                            Azaleas As Houseplants – Can You Grow Azalea Indoors

                            I'm confused about the leafy one, but some kind of palm, in a juvenile state, as Clare says, could be an option I'm thinking.

                            The Begonia looks like the usual fibrous rooted type they use as house plants, can be grown on but usually starts to look tatty I find.
                            Likewise the Kalanchoe.
                             
                            • Like Like x 1
                            • Informative Informative x 1
                            • strongylodon

                              strongylodon Old Member

                              Joined:
                              Feb 12, 2006
                              Messages:
                              12,024
                              Gender:
                              Male
                              Occupation:
                              Retired
                              Location:
                              Wareham, Dorset
                              Ratings:
                              +15,849
                              The Begonia is the standard pot Begonia Elatior and could after repotting last for several months in flower.
                              Hydrangea doesn't necessarily need ericaceous compost but will help to maintain the blue colour although Hydrangea colourant (Aluminium sulphate) is normally used.

                              Kalanchoe need gritty soil/comost being a succulent.

                              The palm is probably small Chyrsalidocarpus lutescens, Areca palm but not 100% sure.
                               
                              • Like Like x 2
                              • Informative Informative x 1

                              Share This Page