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North Borders

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Sandy Ground, Jan 7, 2017.

  1. Sandy Ground

    Sandy Ground Total Gardener

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    This being the quiet season in the garden, I'm thinking about the next borders.

    One particular area is a north border, about 10 metres or so long, and perhaps 2 metres deep. Its in shade all of the day.

    Any ideas as to what could be planted other than grass? Dont say moss! :snork:
     
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    • HarryS

      HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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      That is a large shady area Sandy are you looking for a mixture of shrubs ,perennials and annuals ?
       
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      • Sandy Ground

        Sandy Ground Total Gardener

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        I'm completely open to suggestions. I'll sift through all that are made.

        Having said that, the shade is caused by thuja, and some plants do tend to damage them if they are too close.
         
      • Kandy

        Kandy Will be glad to see the sun again soon.....

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        Siberian Iris
        Hemoracallis (Day Lily)
        Primroses
        Cowslips
        Snowdrops
        Ferns
        Callicarpa (Beauty Berry)
        Iris Pseudacorus

        Will add to the list when I think of other plants.Do you want plants/bulbs for this area or do you want to put shrubs and trees in the border?
         
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        • Sandy Ground

          Sandy Ground Total Gardener

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          I'm thinking bulbs/plants rather than shrubs and trees in the border. Thats purely for practical reasons. The thuja need trimming a couple of times a year, so I need somewhere to put the ladders. Here is a photo that shows the area in which the border will be.

          IMG_4240.JPG

          The photo was taken at exactly 11:42 on a sunny day. As can be seen its in shade even at that time of day.
           
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          • ARMANDII

            ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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            I've planted several layers of bulbs in the borders, including the North, and planted Hardy Perennials on top of them which seems to have worked.:dunno::snorky:
             
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            • Sandy Ground

              Sandy Ground Total Gardener

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              What sort of plants did you use in the north border? Similar to the suggestion @Kandy made?
               
            • "M"

              "M" Total Gardener

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              Stumpery, perhaps? You could always have log cut slices to act as "stepping stones" in front of the Thuja and behind the stumpery to give you access for trimming purposes.

              Here's couple, or three, of photo's from the Stumpery at RHS Wisley that I took on a visit earlier this year:

              CIMG0124.JPGCIMG0123.JPGCIMG0126.JPGCIMG0125.JPGCIMG0127.JPG
               
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              • ARMANDII

                ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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                A mixture of Japanese Anemones, Phlox, Perennial Poppies, Delphiniums, Lavender, Yarrow, Aconitum, Echinacea, Rudbeckia, Sedum, Monarda, Dicentra Spectabilis. Phlomis, Fox Glove, Crocosmia, Eryngium, Teasel, Peonies, Lupin, Astrantia, Alliums, Iris, Geranium, Cirsium, Echinops, Aquilegia,and a few more are what are in my borders, Sandy Ground.:snorky:

                [​IMG]
                [​IMG]
                [​IMG]
                 
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                  Last edited: Jan 7, 2017
                • HarryS

                  HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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                  I do like Stumperys . I would think some skill is needed to build them correctly . I imagine mine would look like a new compost heap !
                  @ARMANDII , very impressive list :blue thumb: Could you possibly list your top 5 from these ? I also have a shadey border for replanting this year.
                   
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                    Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
                  • HarryS

                    HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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                    @Sandy Ground , just been on the Crocus site looking for shrub ideas . They have a very good selection feature for plant types . Where you can select your conditons etc etc . To narrow your choices down from 1040 types !
                    Perennial Plants by Crocus
                     
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                    • Sandy Ground

                      Sandy Ground Total Gardener

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                      From the answers so far, I am beginning to get the beginnings of an idea for the border in question.

                      I do know some mentioned wont work in the area. Most will though.:) Thanks to these answers, I'm getting an excellent starting point. As soon as the snow clears, I'll be out looking how possible things are. In the meantime, keep the suggestions flowing.
                       
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                      • ARMANDII

                        ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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                        To be honest, Harry, I've never planted to impress, but just to bring a smile to my face when sitting in the Arbour with a mug of tea contemplating the world.:coffee::snorky:

                        Echinops [the Bees love them], Japanese Anemones, Plhomis, Aquilegia, Fox Glove, but I don't really have 5 favourites..........as I love them all and tend to plant "shoulder to shoulder":dunno::heehee: I'm also a fan of Ferns as a backdrop and there are quite a few attractive ones.
                         
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                          Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
                        • daitheplant

                          daitheplant Total Gardener

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                          Pachysandra is good, it is low growing, evergreen and flowering.
                           
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                          • Freddy

                            Freddy Miserable git, well known for it

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                            Looks good :blue thumb:


                            IMG_0773.JPG
                             
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                            • Sandy Ground

                              Sandy Ground Total Gardener

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                              Sitting in the garden, contemplating the world is a big part of what gardening is all about. Its peace...

                              @ARMANDII any suggestions as to ferns? They are not something I know anything about.

                              @daitheplant the suggestion of Pachysandra is something that I am looking into. Being ground cover, it "kind of" sparked an idea. If it can be controlled that is. From what I've read so far it can be invasive.
                               
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                              • JWK

                                JWK Gardener

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                                In my shady borders my favourites are:

                                Hellobores - will be coming into flower very soon and keep going for weeks.
                                Arum italicum 'Marmoratum' - will take heavy shade.
                                Bergenia - there are loads of varieties - 'Morgenrote' will give a second flush of flower in July/August
                                Daphnes - gorgeous scent during winter/spring
                                Fatsia japonica - evergreen architectural - can be pruned back if it gets too big.


                                Ferns:
                                Asplenium scolopendrium – Hart’s Tongue Fern
                                Cyrtomium falcatum Japanese Holly Fern
                                Dryopteris filix-mas fern
                                Osmunda Cinnamomea (cinnamon Fern)
                                 
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                                • Sandy Ground

                                  Sandy Ground Total Gardener

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                                  I had a look at the pachysandra. As soon as I saw what it was called in Swedish, I realised that we had tried to use it in the same spot years ago, and it never established. Neither did lavender for that matter.

                                  Its a pity really because I would have loved to have used both.

                                  When pachysandra was taken up, it was tried in another spot also, and never did well there either. I find that surprising, as it is supposed to be quite a tolerant plant.
                                   
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                                  • JWK

                                    JWK Gardener

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                                    I tried it once and it gradually faded away in my garden, I think my soil is too dry for it.
                                     
                                  • ARMANDII

                                    ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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                                    Sorry, for the delay, Sandy, but I've had a busy few days and not been able to more than pop in and out of GC.
                                    Ferns.............I'm always wary of recommending any plants unless I know a person's preference and even then when I recommend a "sure fire" plant I get it wrong as the person isn't as keen on it as I am!!:doh::dunno::heehee: But, I have bought the Ferns that I liked such as Dryoperteris Filix-mas, D. dilata, Matteuccia struthiopteris, Osmunda regalis............all of which I have and are deciduous. Some good evergreen ferns are Polystichum setiferum, Adiantum venustum, and Asplenium scolopendrium. But, for me, the best way is to actually see a Fern for real and decide if I like it. They are so tough and hardy and will basically be, after some thought, a plant that is one of those "let it get on with Life" plants. I use them on the back of borders, in the bog garden, under trees, and along the banks of the wildlife pond. I never really thought "that one's for shade, that one's for dry areas, that one is for wet areas, I merely thought "that one will look nice there! and planted them.............and I've still got all of them. So they've got graceful foliage, reliability, make a nice backdrop, and I love watching them early in the seaons when they're just unfurling their leaves.:hapydancsmil::snorky:
                                     
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