1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Please note - to keep GC running smoothly, from time to time the staff will have to close a long thread and continue it in a new thread. You too can do your bit to help - if you have a long running PM conversation, please terminate the conversation and start a new conversation. For further information, please contact a member of the staff team.
    Dismiss Notice

Old Greenhouse renovation?

Discussion in 'Garden Projects and DIY' started by kr236rk, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. kr236rk

    kr236rk Gardener

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2014
    Messages:
    40
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +31
    Hi,

    Have inherited an old greenhouse, small but useful. Any tips on how I could do a make-over on it please?

    [​IMG]

    Many thanks,

    Ric
     
  2. rustyroots

    rustyroots Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2011
    Messages:
    1,931
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Solihull, West Midlands
    Ratings:
    +2,072
    Hi Ric,

    Is there any rot on it?

    If not I would give the green mouldy looking bits with a wire brush and give it a light rub down with sandpaper and give it a couple of coats of exterior fence/shed paint. Good clean of the glass and inside and it should be ok.

    Rusty
     
  3. Scrungee

    Scrungee Well known for it

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Messages:
    12,248
    Location:
    Central England on heavy clay soil
    Ratings:
    +18,448
    The blocks holding the roof glazing in place look as if they may be in need of replacement. Their fixings (srews/nails?) may have corroded and the timber underneath them is prone to rot so they may need replacing/new fixings/some minor cutting out of rotten timber and making good underneath before giving a fresh coat of treatment.

    If those roof panes will slide out easily, the appearance will be improved if you remove before rubbing down and removing any algae or moss from under the glass before applying that treatment, avoiding a contasting band around the eaves.

    Check the bottom board all round for signs of rot and around side of window openings. If there's any water ingress around edges of glazing a bead clear external silicone sealant (applied aftervtreatment) will weatherproof it, plus help prevent panes from sliding out.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
  4. kr236rk

    kr236rk Gardener

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2014
    Messages:
    40
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +31
    Thanks Scrungee & Rusty,

    Yes, those roof panels are a concern. I did a minor make-do about a year ago, fixed a slat which had dropped down allowing the weather in. Everything seems okay now, can't see any signs of rot. Might I paint creosote on the exterior wood please? Glass all seems to be weather-tight.

    Ric
     
  5. rustyroots

    rustyroots Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2011
    Messages:
    1,931
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Solihull, West Midlands
    Ratings:
    +2,072
    Creosote would be fine.

    Rusty
     
  6. kr236rk

    kr236rk Gardener

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2014
    Messages:
    40
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +31
    Thanks :) Better get those roof blocks sorted first.
     
  7. Upsydaisy

    Upsydaisy Gardener

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2017
    Messages:
    336
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Retired...early!!
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Ratings:
    +695
    Please post a pic when you have done it up @kr236rk :):dbgrtmb:
     
  8. Scrungee

    Scrungee Well known for it

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Messages:
    12,248
    Location:
    Central England on heavy clay soil
    Ratings:
    +18,448
    It might end up looking patchy, if you have some try on a very small section somewhere out of sight because if you don't like how it turns out it could be a very long time before you could use another treatment on top of it.
     
  9. Sandy Ground

    Sandy Ground Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2015
    Messages:
    1,179
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retd. D&D Engineer
    Location:
    Scania, Sweden
    Ratings:
    +2,791
    Probably the best thing to do would be to identify the current treatment and use something similar. I would not use creosote. It works best on untreated wood. At the same time, although it is used in some medicines, it is suspected to be a cause of cancer.

    Having said that, even if all of the old treatment was removed, there are far better preservatives out there that last longer if applied correctly, and are also less harmful to plant. I use a local mix (can post a recipe if asked) that has been used here for hundreds of years. If it survives our climate, it will survive in the UK!
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • kr236rk

      kr236rk Gardener

      Joined:
      Jul 24, 2014
      Messages:
      40
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +31
      Thanks to all :)

      I'd better call into my local garden centre / handy store and see what they advise. Those blocks are a concern - once removed, those triangles of glass, travelling down from the pinnacle, could fall back into the green house unless they were somehow secured from within. :-o
       
    • JWK

      JWK Gardener

      Joined:
      Jun 3, 2008
      Messages:
      18,318
      Gender:
      Male
      Location:
      Surrey
      Ratings:
      +16,710
      I would like to see that @Sandy Ground - we can't get Creosote in the UK it was banned a few years ago. There is a substitute call Creocote which appears to be coloured water with no preservative qualities.
       
    • Sandy Ground

      Sandy Ground Total Gardener

      Joined:
      Jun 10, 2015
      Messages:
      1,179
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      Retd. D&D Engineer
      Location:
      Scania, Sweden
      Ratings:
      +2,791
      The mix is (and apologies if I have translated incorrectly).

      1 part 100% Pine Wood Tar (sometimes called Stockholms tar or oil) 1 part Balsamic Turpentine, and 1 part Boiled Linseed oil. That will give a nice golden colour to pine. Most people would also add a pigment in the ratio 1 or 2 parts to 8 in weight. Generally, the pigment would be black or red.

      The pine wood tar can be replaced with Cedar wood tar.

      I treated this gate I made with the black variant...

      DSCN1752_2.jpg

      I can add a couple of tips as regards preparing the mix, as well as applying it as well.
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Informative Informative x 1
      • Friendly Friendly x 1
      • JWK

        JWK Gardener

        Joined:
        Jun 3, 2008
        Messages:
        18,318
        Gender:
        Male
        Location:
        Surrey
        Ratings:
        +16,710
        Yes please Sandy.

        Can't seem to find a seller of this in the UK, perhaps it has another name over here?
         
        • Friendly Friendly x 1
        • Sandy Ground

          Sandy Ground Total Gardener

          Joined:
          Jun 10, 2015
          Messages:
          1,179
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Retd. D&D Engineer
          Location:
          Scania, Sweden
          Ratings:
          +2,791
          @JWK These people have it:

          Balsam turpentine - Mike Wye

          When its being applied, put on way too much. Whenever its possible, I would use a spray gun, then remove the "puddles" using a brush. Just push the excess to drier places. Do it at regular intervals for the first couple of weeks until the wood doesnt want to take any more. A year or so later, one final coat...then perhaps another after 10 years.

          If you decide to use pigment, mix it up in a little turpentine before adding.

          Although I did not do so on the gate, it does work on metal also.
           
          • Informative Informative x 2
          • Like Like x 1
          • Scudo

            Scudo Gardener

            Joined:
            Oct 28, 2016
            Messages:
            91
            Gender:
            Male
            Occupation:
            Retired layabout
            Location:
            Central Scotland
            Ratings:
            +152

          Share This Page