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Out of control Rockery!

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by RobynP, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. RobynP

    RobynP Apprentice Gardener

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    Hello everyone!

    I am new to the forum and a novice gardener. We moved a couple of years ago and have acquired a fairly big rockery. It had been neglected for quite a few years but has some beautiful plants growing among the rest of the out of control sections. We cut everything back extensively last year however as we did't remove any of the roots it has grown back with a vengeance this year.

    We do not want to start removing rocks and root systems so I'm guessing the only way to get back to scratch is to use a strong weed killer over most of the rockery and start all over again. There are some rose bushes and a Japanese cherry tree that we would love to keep so would obviously need to be careful around them. Does anyone have an idea of the best thing we could use to clear it for good? Also the best time of year that we should do this?

    Sorry for so many questions! We love the rockery so much and would like to get it looking great again, I do like the wild look but this is a bit too much!

    Thank you in advance for any help and advice you may be able to give me
     

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    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      Hiya RobynP :)

      I would cut everything back...and do it now. Select what you like to keep and mark what you dont want. Then apply glyphosate when the regrowth appears. Careful not to spray the plants you want.

      Doing it now enables you to treat the "weeds"/plants you dont want and allows rapid regrowth of those plants you like.

      Agree, I can see why you love it so much :)
       
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      • RobynP

        RobynP Apprentice Gardener

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        Thank you so much Verdun, your advice is very helpful.

        So it looks like we will strim everything right back that needs to go and then treat with the glyphosate, we already have some from as we use it on the driveway, could you please advise as to the ratio we should be using? I understand that we need to be careful around things we would like to keep but how much of a distance should we keep the spray from the things we would like to keep? I'm just a bit worried that if it rains it may spread the glyphosate to plants we would like to keep.

        I anticipate that we will not be able to keep many of the smaller plants such as the peonies as they are in the thick of it but I should be able to start fresh next year if I understand you correctly?

        Thank you again :bigthumb:
         
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        • Verdun

          Verdun Passionate gardener

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          By cutting hard back everything you should be able to specifically target the "weeds" thus using less weedkiller, it is more effective on new young growth and your chosen plants, hopefully, will be more easily protected.
          Ratio? Are you mixing your own? If the dilution rate is missing on your product, check it out on products in store or online. However, a squirt of washing up liquid helps weedkiller to stick better.
          If the glyphosate doesnt actually touch your wanted plants all will be well. Rain simply nullifies the affect of glyphosate....hence you need 5 or 6 hours of dry weather after application for it to work. Rain does not spread the glyphosate onto other plants and kill them.
          You could lift your peonies RobynP. Now is a good time. Dig them up, clean them up, pot them up or replant in cleared soil (remember not to plant them too deeply...peonies need sun on their uppermost root structure) :)
           
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          • Gail_68

            Gail_68 Guest

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            Hello @RobynP :sign0016: to GC and nice to have you with us.

            You have a lovely wonderland there :love30: and thank you for adding the pic's for members to view..much appreciated and Verdun is excellent with advice :)
             

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