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Overwintering container grown Euphorbia

Discussion in 'Container Gardening' started by Jane Lee, Jul 20, 2018.

  1. Jane Lee

    Jane Lee Apprentice Gardener

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    I've just bought three beautiful euphorbias "Tasmanian Tiger" to grow in large containers. Can anyone advise me on the best way (hopefully not too difficult) to see them through the winter?
     
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    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      Yes Jane

      They are not too difficult. They are hardy, tough, evergreen and adaptable. They are very attractive in my opinion too :)

      I have only grown them in the open ground but I would use john innes number 3 compost and keep them fairly dry esp over winter. They do not like being moved too often either. You can grow them in sun or partial shade.....in partial shade I think their variegated foliage shows up best.
      I would also put a few chippings down after planting......to reflect the foliage, stabilise moisture levels and simply look good:)

      When they flower remove the flowered stem.....in mid spring.

      Be aware, all euphorbias have a toxic, caustic sap so be careful when cutting them:)
       
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        Last edited: Jul 20, 2018
      • Jane Lee

        Jane Lee Apprentice Gardener

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        Thanks Verdun. I wasn't sure whether they would be hardy, having read they need winter protection. Temperatures here have been known to drop to -11. I have all three in containers near a wall and south facing so I'm hoping that will give them some protection.

        Like you suggested, I used john innes number 3 compost. And horticultural grit to top dress them. When temperatures start to plummet I think I'll add bark chippings as extra protection.

        I hope I do get a chance to see them flower. Fingers crossed this will be a mild winter. :smile:
         
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        • Verdun

          Verdun Passionate gardener

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          No, not bark Jane. If you are concerned when temps drop very low cover with a fleece :)
           
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          • Jane Lee

            Jane Lee Apprentice Gardener

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            Thank you again Verdun. Yes I can see the wisdom in that. Will do. :smile:
             
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            • Gail_68

              Gail_68 Guest

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              Hello @Jane Lee :sign0016: to GC and nice to have you with us :)

              Your in excellent hands with Verdun as his garden and plants are out standing to the eye :love30:
               

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