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Part of the Alpine section at the Biological Gardens at Copenhagen

Discussion in 'Alpine Gardening' started by David E Peacock, Oct 19, 2016.

  1. David E Peacock

    David E Peacock Gardener

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    2016-10-13 033.JPG [ [2016-10-13 028.JPG2016-10-13 026.JPG2016-10-13 027.JPG [ I have posted a few photos of the above taken last Tuesday. It was refreshing to me that admission to the gardens and Green/Palm Houses was free!

    All plants were clearly names.

    Other photos will be posted in the General Section.2016-10-13 026.JPG [] ]2016-10-13 027.JPG
     
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      Last edited: Oct 19, 2016
    • Zigs

      Zigs Naughty Ginger Admin Staff Member

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    • "M"

      "M" Total Gardener

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      That looks like a lovely place to visit; thank you for sharing it with us :thumbsup:
       
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      • kindredspirit

        kindredspirit Gardening around a big Puddle. :)

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      • Fern4

        Fern4 Total Gardener

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      • Redwing

        Redwing Wild Gardener

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        Love the second picture.
         
      • David E Peacock

        David E Peacock Gardener

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        @Redwing

        I like that one too!
        Yet I was spoiled for choice as which photos to post as I had taken lots.

        I intend to build a small alpine section in my own garden based on the first photo. I have lots of broken pavings which I intend to place "on edge" as shown in the photo . .

        By the way, my title was wrong, it should have been "The Botanical Garden"

        Look out for my next posting where I intend to post various photos of the main garden. You can tell how big it is when I tell you it took most of a day to cover it and then missing some!
         
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        • Redwing

          Redwing Wild Gardener

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          I think that type of natural rock formations looking like that is called 'karst'. I have seen some beautiful examples of it in Southern Europe at some higher elevations, probably at around 1000m and above and also at some lower elevations where the right type of rocky outcrop occurs. I too have been inspired by it. I have tried to incorporate some of that 'feel' in my Mediterranean style garden.
           
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          • Redwing

            Redwing Wild Gardener

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            This is an example of what I mean, from Sardinia. I think it would be full of wildflowers in Spring growing out of all those cracks.

            image.jpeg
             
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            • Aldo

              Aldo Gardener

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              Thanks for bringing back good memories with that photo, I miss that kind of landscape, and the olive trees shaped by the wind, and how the scent changes over the year :)
              Speaking of which, I think you are potentially right, but not necessarily.
              Sardinia is a very windy place, and sometimes terribly warm, as I am sure you must have noticed while there.
              In my experience, dependently on the location, it is often the case that at least one side of that kind of rock formations will stay quite barren even at Spring and Summer time, if it is not sheltered enough. At least, beyond certain pioneer plants that seem to grow on no soil, pretty much.
              Conversely, if that place is in a sheltered valley, it might indeed get covered at certain times of the year.
              To be clear, mine is not an expert opinion though, more something I noticed and your post made me think of.
               
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                Last edited: May 8, 2018
              • kindredspirit

                kindredspirit Gardening around a big Puddle. :)

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                This is near me, (the Burren), and is chocker block full of Alpine and Mediterranean plants living side by side in the grykes of this karst landscape. From a distance it looks like all rock and you only notice the tiny plants when you're actually walking across it as opposed to driving by in a car.

                burren.jpg
                 
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                • Redwing

                  Redwing Wild Gardener

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                  @Aldo I am not an expert either. I appreciate what you are saying about the heat and exposure. I did notice there that many of the vinyards were planted on north facing slopes, probably for this reason, reducing sun and heat and retaining moisture. Probably the same for the flowers not growing on the southern sides of the rock outcrops. I love the bent and knarled olive trees shaped by the wind.

                  @kindredspirit nice picture and illustrates perfectly the karst landscape.
                   
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                  • Aldo

                    Aldo Gardener

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                    That's quite beautiful.
                    I would love to have a place like that close, to take a walk and explore at different times of the year.
                     
                  • Aldo

                    Aldo Gardener

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                    I think you are right that people will try and plant grapes on that side of the hills, if at all possible. Once a friend of my dad, who had a few hectares of vinyards, told me it influenced the taste, and therefore the wine quality. I remember he had not been able to place his plants exactly where he wanted, because of soil quality perhaps, and then he regretted it every year at picking time :)
                    And I think tomatoes tend to be planted on the southern sides, and moscatello grapes, the small ones which are used for sweet liquors, again facing south (but I might be wrong, it was many years ago).

                    I just booked our tickets for the Summer, so I will probably take a walk or two and check what is the prevalent direction for different crops, out of curiosity.
                     
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