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Replacement climbing rose?

Discussion in 'Roses' started by NessaJ70, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. NessaJ70

    NessaJ70 Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi, we inherited a climbing rose on a south facing wall when we moved in two years ago. The rose didn't look like it had been looked after for years as was very twisted and straggly and looked very diseased. I gave it a hard prune and sprayed it regulary but the leaves were very spotted and flowers died after a few days. I have now admitted defeat and taken it out. I'd like to replace it with another rose but have been told that you shouldn't plant another rose where a diseased one has been previously. Is this the case? If so, any other suggestions for a lovely flowering climber to replace it? Many thanks
     
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    • ARMANDII

      ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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      "Replant disease
      Replant disorder or replant disease refers to the problem of re-establishing plants in soil where the same species was previously grown. Roses are particularly prone, though it can affect other trees and shrubs.

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      Quick facts
      Common name Replant disease
      Scientific name None
      Plants affected Various, commonly roses and apples
      Main causes Probably soil pests and pathogens
      Timing Over the first few seasons after planting
      Jump to

      What is replant disease?


      Replant disease is a recognised but poorly understood problem. It occurs when a plant is replaced with the same type. For most plants this does not cause a problem. However, for others, most notably roses and others in the rose family, the new plant fails to thrive or put on decent growth. The roots of the previous plant need only to have been in the soil for a few months for the problem to occur.





      Symptoms


      Plants affected by replant disease may show the following;

      • New plantings may struggle to establish, make poor growth and may even die. This is most noticeable when a plant growing in affected soil is compared with one planted at the same time in unaffected or sterilized soil
      • Roots will grow poorly and fine roots may be rotten
      Frequently affected:
      Apple
      Cherry (edible)
      Citrus
      Flowering cherry (on Prunus avium rootstock)
      Peach
      Pear
      Plum (on St Julien A rootstock)
      Quince
      Rose (on Rosa canina rootstock)

      Occasionally or slightly affected:
      Pine
      Raspberry
      Spruce
      Strawberry
      Vine



      Control


      Non-chemical control:
      The problem varies in severity and sometimes does not occur at all.

      An indication can be obtained by test planting several plants of the same variety in both the soil in question and in other soil which has never grown that plant, and comparing vigour over the first one or two seasons. For roses, a comparison in pots over one season would probably be sufficient.

      If the problem occurs, lift the plant, shake off the soil and replant in another site where the species has not been grown before. The plant will often recover.

      Five steps to avoiding replant disease:
      STEP 1: Swap the soil with fresh soil from another part of the garden. The soil should be removed to make a planting hole that is a few centimetres larger than the full spread of the roots. This is usually about 60cm (2ft) diameter and at least 30cm (1ft) deep.

      STEP 2: Some gardeners have used a cardboard box with the bottom removed to line the hole; by the time the cardboard rots away, the plant has established.

      STEP 3: Boost plant growth by applying fertiliser high in nitrogen, such as sulphate of ammonia or hoof and horn.

      STEP 4: Mycorrhizal products are claimed by the manufacturers to be effective in counteracting replant problems. These usually come in a sachet and can be sprinkled into the planting hole.

      STEP 5: Place the plant in the ground. Improve soil structure by incorporating some well-rotted manure or organic matter into the back-fill soil and firm this around the roots. Water well.

      Resistance: some rootstocks confer resistance. Roses on Rosa 'Laxa', apples on M27, cherries on 'Colt' and plums on Myrobalan B show more resistance than those on other commonly used rootstocks. Roses on Rosacanina and flowering cherries on Prunus avium are more susceptible.

      Chemical control:
      No chemical soil sterilants are available to home gardeners. Soil sterilisation by steam is possible, but difficult and expensive to organise.



      Biology


      This problem is well known in apples, where is has been called "specific apple replant disease" and roses, where it has been known as "rose sickness".

      It is believed to be caused by a build-up of soil pests and pathogens during the life of the first planting. Fungal root diseases and nematodes (eelworms) are favourite suspects.

      Because levels build up gradually over the years, populations do not reach high levels until the first generation plants are mature and robust enough to tolerate them. However, when the land is replanted with young plants, the small root systems encounter a high residual population of pathogens or nematodes and struggle to establish. The problem can persist for at least nine years following removal of the first planting.

      The best evidence in favour of this theory is that the problem is eliminated by soil sterilisation, suggesting a biological cause. Although traditionally believed to affect only the previously planted species - apples are affected following apples, but cherries following apples are not - more recent evidence suggests the effects are more widespread. This would be understandable if a build-up of soil pathogens and nematodes was responsible, because most of these are not specific to individual plants."


      So you can dig out the soil in the area that the rose was planted and replace it with soil from another part of the garden, Nessa, and that should solve the problem.

      I hate recommending specific roses as peoples tastes in plants varies so much and it's such a personal thing.........and there are such a huge variety of roses out there:hate-shocked:. I guess you have to settle for a colour first, will it have thorns or be thornless?, will it be a single flowering or a repeat flowering type?, do you want scent or not?:scratch:
      I have a similar problem to you where I have roses on either side of my Arbour as one of the Roses [Compassion] doesn't seem to like my sandy, free draining soil...
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      "
      But instead of replacing the Compassion" [pink] rose I want to keep it and I've bought rose "creme de la creme"
      upload_2018-2-5_20-18-50.jpeg

      which is a repeat flowering, scented, but very thorny, climbing rose, which I will plant near the "Compassion" rose and train towards the side of the Arbour so that, eventually, it will grow and mingle with "Compassion"
       
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        Last edited: Feb 5, 2018
      • NessaJ70

        NessaJ70 Apprentice Gardener

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        Hi Armandii, thank you very much, that's extremely helpful. I like the thought of having another rose there if possible so transferring a load of new soil in should help. Thanks again.
         
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        • wiseowl

          wiseowl Friendly Owl Admin Staff Member

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          Hello @NessaJ70 friend you can plant a rose in the same place(I have done it many times over the years) just take the old soil about a meter square hole and and as deep as is possible in your circumstances,I would then use John Innes NO 3 with a mix 50% and 50% good soil from another part of the garden,if you would like to tell me what colour you would prefer then I could advise you further:smile:

          ps Rose sickness is very rare I have only seen it 3 times in 60 years;)
           
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          • NessaJ70

            NessaJ70 Apprentice Gardener

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            Thanks very much Wiseowl, I'll do that. When would you say the ideal time to plant would be?
            I particularly like yellow/orange roses so any suggestions for a climber would be great.
             
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            • wiseowl

              wiseowl Friendly Owl Admin Staff Member

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              Hi @NessaJ70 you are most welcome my friend what about this one,a friend of mine as one in his garden it is repeat flowering:smile:

              Rose Masquerade
              C456A267AA7E756DCCF9D6C54927BF68.jpg
               
            • ARMANDII

              ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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              I have "Masquerade" as a climbing rose in my garden which decorates the Gable end archway of my house, Nessa, and it's been there for over 35 years. We bought it as a celophaned dry root plant for ten shillings [50p] and it has flowered every year from Spring up the the middle of Winter. It is an old fashioned rose and is susceptible to Rust and Black Spot, but no more
              than other old fashioned roses:dunno: I believe the name "Masquerade" comes from the fact that the rose flower changes colour over the season giving the impression that there are several different roses masquerading behind each colour!! It's my oldest rose and has given value and pleasure above and beyond expectations and I wouldn't change it.........however, there are such a lot of great roses out there.:snorky:

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              So with "Masquerade" you get this...........
              [​IMG]
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              • NessaJ70

                NessaJ70 Apprentice Gardener

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                Wow, that's a beautiful rose, a real chameleon! Thanks both :)
                 
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