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Starting cuttings in glasses of water?

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by andrewh, Jun 10, 2009.

  1. andrewh

    andrewh Gardener

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    I've never had much success with cuttings. The only thing I've found to work is to stick them in a glass of water until they sprout roots, and then pot them up.

    For all of the advise you see and read about cuttings, Carol Klein and her pots and grit and whatever, could it be that this is actually the best method? I suppose it can only work for softwood cuttings, but still, it seems more successful to me, yet none of the "experts" or books mention it at all.

    The exception is a basal stem cutting I took from a Dahlia a couple of weeks ago, which I did "by the book" and is very much enjoying life.
     
  2. Sussexgardener

    Sussexgardener Gardener

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    If it works for you. I've used this method for spider plant babies, geraniums and sage (those are the ones that I remember).
     
  3. lollipop

    lollipop Gardener

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    I use this method mostly with ivy cuttings as it seems to be the best way for this plant for me. I am more and more coming round to using pure vermiculite, although I am slowly considering the use of rock wool especially for the lupins, they seem to rot off more than anything else I have tried.

    Still, there's a lot to be said for the old fashioned methods of water or just shoving them in the dirt.
     
  4. Rhyleysgranny

    Rhyleysgranny Gardener

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    I rooted roses this way. I have to say it was unintentional but I was so amazed it happened.
     
  5. plant1star

    plant1star Gardener

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    I've just rooted two tomato side shoots in water, and potted them up for the extra plants. I also have a vase full of potentilla, buddleja, camellia, and escalonia! I can't wait for them to root!

    It works for me at times, and I prefer it to using other methods. Each to your own, and what ever works for you.
     
  6. clueless1

    clueless1 member... yep, that's what I am:)

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    I got buddleja to take by shoving a piece into a pot of completely waterlogged compost for a couple of weeks.

    Incidentally, I've read many an article about the wonders of Willow as a rooting aid for cuttings. We all know that Willow takes really easily, but there have been some studies (both in the science world and by ordinary folks) that suggest that whatever chemical Willow contains that makes it root so easily, also affects other plants. I've read that simply putting a piece of Willow in the water with your cuttings increases the success rate. I've never tried it though so can't comment from experience.
     
  7. capney

    capney Head Gardener

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    Always worked for my mum. but then she had the green finger touch.
    Everywhere she went and spotted a nice plant a little piece would end up in a jam jar.
     
  8. Alice

    Alice Gardener

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    There's nothing wrong with rooting cuttings in water Andrew if it works. I find it works for some plants but not for others but always worth a try.

    That's an interesting suggestion about willow Clueless. I've never heard that. Every day's a school day and something new to learn.
     
  9. lollipop

    lollipop Gardener

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    Willow?...................is that that stuff that's in aspirin? Or have all my schooldays memories gone awry? Maybe a soluble aspirin would help when rooting in water?
     
  10. andrewh

    andrewh Gardener

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    Is there a particular type of plant that it will work better on, Alice?

    Your name reminds me, by the way, that I learned and was inspired to do my successful Dahlia cutting by Alys on BBC Gardeners World.

    For all the whinging from some quarters about the new programme, I think it's great - jam packed with stuff if you watch properly (without wishing to offend anyone, I think it may just be a bit too fast-paced for old timers)

    But back on topic, I took a Chrysanth cutting a week or so ago that's looking healthy. Perhaps I'm getting better!
     
  11. lollipop

    lollipop Gardener

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    I beg your pardon Andrew-you're not that much younger than I am-I'm only 35!. And I do watch it properly.

    Cor blimey!! The youth of today-I ask ya!
     
  12. andrewh

    andrewh Gardener

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    I've always believed you are over the hill at 33, Claire.

    Well, I've believed that for a year anyway. Next year I might revise it upward to 34...
     
  13. clueless1

    clueless1 member... yep, that's what I am:)

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    Aspirin is a synthetic substitute of something that occurs naturally in Willow. For centuries folklore had it that chewing willow bark relieved aches and pains, then the scientists found it to be down to some chemical or other that's in there. Aspirin is a synthetic version of it. I doubt if an aspirin tablet would aid cuttings rooting, but there's no harm in trying it. It has the added bonus that if you come downstairs with a banging hangover one day and want to drink the first thing that comes to hand, it will already have an aspirin in it.
     
  14. andrewh

    andrewh Gardener

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    This thread seems appropriate for another question I have by the way - Strawberry propagation.

    I have runners pegged down as we speak. Now, I've read an interesting tip in one of my growing mountain of gardening books (this one by Fred Loads - any old timers heard of him? I think Claire's generation might have...!!)

    Namely that the new plants you grow from runners can be fruited in the same year. Any thoughts on this?
     
  15. lollipop

    lollipop Gardener

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    Oi you!!!

    I might have told you but I won't now.
     

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