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Strawberry tower questions

Discussion in 'Container Gardening' started by totalwise, May 13, 2018.

  1. totalwise

    totalwise Apprentice Gardener

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    Hi

    I have around 40 starwberry plants on beds. They take up a lot of room and I rarely get to eat the starwberries before the slugs get to them.

    I have decided to build a strawberry tower to solve my 2 issues with space and slugs.

    I have attached a picture of my tower below:
    strawberry planter.jpg
    The tower is not finished yet. I am going to put these on a base of wooden stilts which will be electrified with 9v wire which will zap any slugs that try to climb up.

    I have seen towers made my other people in pintrest where people just drill a hole into the timber and squeeze the plants in. They regret because they cannot water the plants very well. Watering from the top does not trickle down to the bottom. So I decided to spend the time and make balconies for it, hoping to water them easier.

    I am having a bit of cold feet transporting the plants over just yet. I am thinking of putting an internal watering system as well. I was going to make a watering system shown below, built using PVC pipes. There seems to be a lot of talk online on how PVC is a toxic and dangerous chemical to use. I was hoping for some clarification on this.

    My plan is provided below, a lot of people are using a straight pipe with holes in them. I didn't want to use that design, because the soil can easily flow into the pipe through the holes over time and block it up. So I have come up with this design so that the water distributes evenly and the soil can't flow into the pipe.
    Image0015.JPG
     
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    • Marley Farley

      Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

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      I like your thinking, strawberry towers are a super idea but keeping them all watered is always a problem growing in towers.. I like your idea of the watering system though so you will have to let us know if it is a success..! :thumbsup:
       
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      • Aldo

        Aldo Gardener

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        I am not an expert in any way, but I like your project.
        For my strawberries, I ended up making stackable planters and planting them on the sides, to avoid the pests' issues you mention. (and infections too).
        And yes, it is not ideal in terms of irrigation. But given they are basically 120 liters boxes, partially insulated on all sides, the soil tend to stay moister than it would otherwise and I can put larger plants on top, which benefit of the 40cm or so depth.

        Or so I hope, for the moment the strawberries seems to be doing reasonably ok with occasional watering from the top.

        Out of curiosity, are you going to fit your tower with some moisture retentive material, in addition to the dripping system you described?
         
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        • totalwise

          totalwise Apprentice Gardener

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          I haven't planned anything specific with regards moisture retention. Perhaps cover the "balcony tops" with some material to prevent evaporation. I am happy to hand water them myself during the summer. But issues would be during winter when I'm barely in the garden during the winter so never water them.
           
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          • Aldo

            Aldo Gardener

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            I don't think they will need much water in the winter months.
            I had the same doubt last November, as I had 70+ new plants from runners on a table in the garden, and asked here on the forum.
            I was told that they do not require much in terms of watering, because they go to sleep over the winter.
            Indeed, they survived snow, frost and more, they are quite tough.
            What they did not like at all was the mini heatwave in April. It killed 20 of them in their small pots.
            So, I would be more worried about good irrigation over late spring, summer and early Autumn than over Winter.
            But I am not an expert, I am just talking based on my recent experience.

            Covering the top soil with horticultural fleece will slow down evaporation considerably, I noticed.
            I know there are soil retention mats of all kinds, and also materials such as vermiculite which you can mix with the soil and will absorb water and then release it slowly when the soil around dries up.
            I have also seen this stuff, as an alternative to using pipes: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B076J5T...olid=1UYRCCEOQU78V&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

            Being ceramic it works a bit like vermiculite, terracotta and similar, via porosity of the material and capillary action.
            I cannot vouch for any of the above, beside hortocultural membrane though.
             
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            • Notty1975

              Notty1975 Gardener

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              I like the idea of you’re watering system although seems a bit complicated and costly you could use overflow pipe which is relatively cheap from Toolstation/screwfix (im using it to make a fruit cage at the moment) but my advice to you for the watering would be use a 40 mm waste pipe with 1.5-2mm holes drilled and then wrap it with capillary mat secured with cable ties thus stopping soil entering tube as for pvc being toxic I remember reading somewhere it was ok and hope so as my entire water system on my allotment from collection to delivery is all pvc solvent weld waste from 50mm down to 21.5mm(overflow) and nice idea with the 9v battery it works well and funny to watch
               
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              • Aldo

                Aldo Gardener

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                As I understand, PVC is in itself inert with respect to solvents such as water. I remember reading that sometimes addictives are used in PVC, which can be a problem.

                Out of curiosity, have you tried the pipe and capillary mat solution?
                If you have, how many hole would you advise drilling? Would you put caps on both ends to slow the water?

                I was thinking to make something like that for a planter I am making, bury it in the soil and fill it up with water.
                Actually, I was thinking of using soda bottles wrapped in capillary matting and buried in the soil, with the cap on but perhaps drilled. But of course they are less rigid than PVC pipe.
                 
              • Notty1975

                Notty1975 Gardener

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                I used it a while back in a strawberry tower (blue barrel) and it worked well drilled 1mm holes and put an end cap on it
                 
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                • Aldo

                  Aldo Gardener

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                  Thanks!
                  I might give it a go.
                  I am still deciding whether I should go for clay pots, pipes and mat, or bottles and mat. I need to research a bit more.
                   
                • totalwise

                  totalwise Apprentice Gardener

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                  I've put in a straight PVC pipe in with holes wrapped in capillary matting sheets to prevent soil from entering.

                  Transplanting the strawberry plants into the tower was a little heartbreaking as the plants become limp for a short period and then take 3-4 days to recover from. I've picked the wrong time to transplant as many of the plants have fruited and I can see a lot of strawberries forming.

                  Here a picture of my tower, on the background you can see one of the older planters on the background.

                  On the tower I have transplanted the same number of strawberry plants as was in one of the planters as you can see it looks very sparse on the tower. This is because there just wasn't sufficient room for all the plants to grow leaves. The tower creates a lot more room.

                  planter 2.jpg
                   
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