1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

What am I doing wrong?

Discussion in 'Cacti and Succulents' started by Amy_aloevera, Nov 13, 2018.

Tags:
  1. Amy_aloevera

    Amy_aloevera Apprentice Gardener

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2018
    Messages:
    1
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi just wondering if anyone can help me, I have had aloe Vera plants for around half a year now and recently I took some cuttings they were all growing well untill he last week when I’ve looked and all the leaves are browning. When I’ve touched it it’s all fallen apart

    I have 3 others and I am hoping to save them, can anyone give me any advice?

    Also is this root rot?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Janet mahay

    Janet mahay Gardener

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2018
    Messages:
    34
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +55
    aloe plants do not need frequent watering. In fact, overwatering your aloe canl lead to root rot and browning. ... To prevent browned leaves due to overwatering, water your aloe only when the soil has completely dried out. Also sudden temp eg shade to sun can also Brown their leaves if the soil wet dont water
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Doghouse Riley

      Doghouse Riley Head Gardener

      Joined:
      Sep 1, 2009
      Messages:
      2,901
      Gender:
      Male
      Occupation:
      "Pleasantly unemployed."
      Location:
      South Manchester
      Ratings:
      +2,537
      Good advice.

      But if I want to know what I'm doing wrong, I've only to ask my wife.
       
      • Creative Creative x 1
      • Janet mahay

        Janet mahay Gardener

        Joined:
        Oct 24, 2018
        Messages:
        34
        Gender:
        Female
        Ratings:
        +55
        Lol women rule
         
        • Agree Agree x 1
        • PaulB3

          PaulB3 Gardener

          Joined:
          Jul 21, 2017
          Messages:
          87
          Gender:
          Male
          Occupation:
          Professional Gardener
          Location:
          Lincolnshire UK
          Ratings:
          +218
          HaHa , maybe in your world Janet!:nonofinger:
           
          • Agree Agree x 1
          • Marley Farley

            Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

            Joined:
            May 11, 2005
            Messages:
            28,785
            Occupation:
            Gardener Councillor Governor Homemaker
            Location:
            Under the Edge Zone 8b
            Ratings:
            +10,620
            @Amy_aloevera.. looks like root rot to me as it’s been kept too wet...You don’t take cuttings from them normally, you wait for them to have pups.. Water very sparingly, a nice sunny frost free window and keep pot bound and they should have pups :SUNsmile:
             
            • Like Like x 1
            • Agree Agree x 1
            • Mike Allen

              Mike Allen Gardener

              Joined:
              Jan 4, 2014
              Messages:
              565
              Gender:
              Male
              Ratings:
              +997
              Over watering or under watering. That is the question. If I may, dear friends. Yes, apart from setting seed, there are several means by which plants naturally increase. Bulbously, rhinotomally, natural splitting etc etc. A great advantage with succulentes is their fleshy composition. Many succulents tend to drop bits and bobs. If left, these will in time root and grow to maturity. Plants having fleshy parts, these ranging from Begonias to stonecrop, vegative propagation can be used.

              In the case of so-called root rot. Sadly this has become a hic-cup. Actually it is basal rot. Likened to basal rot in bulbs and corms. Pathologically. Root rot will show the rotting of the roots. Basal rot on the other hand shows a rotting between the plant base and the roots. No problems. A practical tip. If you have perhaps dropped a clanger, don't give up. Remove the plant from the pot and let it dry out for a day or two. Now if it looks to be at death's doors. Chop it up.. You have nothing to lose. Gently press the cuttings onto a seed bed that has been watered. Leave alone. Soon you will see signes of life. Carefully spray with water. When a strong rooting system has developed, then by all means prick out and pot up. If all this fails. Never mind. The damned plat was dying anyway.
               
              • Like Like x 1
              • pete

                pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

                Joined:
                Jan 9, 2005
                Messages:
                25,659
                Gender:
                Male
                Occupation:
                joinery
                Location:
                Mid Kent
                Ratings:
                +23,353
                I think everyone is right, too wet, but to add my bit, ......I wonder if they had actually rooted?

                Personally, I'd say without a heated propagator and lighting, getting anything to root at this time of the year is pretty much a no no.

                Also, all cuttings from succulents should be allowed to callous over for at least a few days, often longer, before attempting to root them.
                Another good plan is to cover the very gritty compost, that you intend rooting the cutting into, with a layer of grit or sharp sand, it stops the base lying in damp compost during the rooting compost.
                Quite a few succulents will actually start to form roots without any rooting medium, and actually root into damp air, so often a cutting on its side put in warmth and sprayed a couple of times a day will start to root.:smile:

                PS, in @Amy_aloevera picture the compost looks far too moisture retentive, it should contain a fair amount of grit or sand.
                 
                • Agree Agree x 2
                • PaulB3

                  PaulB3 Gardener

                  Joined:
                  Jul 21, 2017
                  Messages:
                  87
                  Gender:
                  Male
                  Occupation:
                  Professional Gardener
                  Location:
                  Lincolnshire UK
                  Ratings:
                  +218
                  Pete
                  Last year I took a three-foot top cutting from a very large and unwieldy Pilosocereus azureus ; left it to callous for five-months , whereupon adventitious roots were developing .
                  Potted up and is now growing as normal .
                  The resilience of plants is amazing .
                   
                  • Like Like x 2
                  • Informative Informative x 1

                  Share This Page