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What to do with 'woody' lavender

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Blueroses, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. Blueroses

    Blueroses Gardener

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    I have a lavender (small) bush a few years old, which has gone all woody and rather shabby looking after this winter. Is it time to replace or can I do anything ?

    Thank you
     
  2. Sussexgardener

    Sussexgardener Gardener

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    You can try cutting it back now. Not too drastic and not into the old wood as it won't regrow from there. It might be time to replace it though - they are usually short lived plants.
     
  3. lollipop

    lollipop Gardener

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    I would ( again in contrast to previous advice) say give up the battle.

    You can salvage something by using any new growth you get this year to get some cuttings then get shot of it.

    They are too easy to propagate from than to waste any time trying to save an old straggly one.
     
  4. Boghopper

    Boghopper Gardener

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    Thanks Claire. We were looking at our lavender bed only today and wondering if it was worth resurrecting the rather woody, straggly plants. You've answered the question!:thumb:

    BTW, have you had any success with taking cuttings and if so, when do you reckon the best time is?

    Chris
     
  5. Sussexgardener

    Sussexgardener Gardener

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    I've taken cuttings of Lavender in summer after flowering but it took ages for them to root and not all worked. I still have one, a couple of years on and it looks rather pathetic! I might chuck it and buy a new one!
     
  6. lollipop

    lollipop Gardener

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    You're welcome Chris,

    I get a lot of cuttings from lavender, I think it is more luck than judgement though lol.


    I take cuttings quite early really, as soon as I see any likely looking shoots tbh-it's very much dependant on when I remember to take them though as I have struck cuttings at all times whenever I can see fresh growth. For me the earlier, the better as they take a while longer than you would think to grow roots and they go mouldy quite quickly if they get too wet. I think the secret is the soil you use-years of failed cuttings later it finally sunk in my head that the mould might have something to do with them being in badly drained soil. At least half and half compost and vermiculite watering them in with a fungicide solution, bag over them and on the bottom shelf in the greenhouse. As soon as they have rooted I get them outside though-because my constant problem in my greenhouse is mould ( despite my constantly cleaning everything)-they are far safer outside with me.
     
  7. has bean counter

    has bean counter Apprentice Gardener

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    French lavender is only "frost hardy". English lavendar is fully hardy.

    If its only frost hardy I would throw it out and start again. If its the english I would trim with shears and if you get new growth all well and good, but nothing lost if it doesn't as you will still have plenty of time to buy a new one.

    They all need to be planted in full sun, sheltered position, well drained and poorish soil. Excess nitrogen produces lots of growth that doesn't get fully hardened before the winter.

    If I was planting a new one I would add grit to the soil and only use a handfull of bonemeal
     
  8. Sussexgardener

    Sussexgardener Gardener

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    At the price young lavender plants are sold for, I find it a lot easier just to buy a new one (sorry if that offends anyone who watches the pennies!). Even small ones grow rapidly in the first year.
     
  9. lollipop

    lollipop Gardener

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    tbh that is probably what I would do if I had the money and was in a garden centre that wasn't selling peonies lol.

    It is always worth looking at growing them from seed as well.
     
  10. Blueroses

    Blueroses Gardener

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    Thank you all for your input into my query, I think on balance I will go for a nice new one :)
     
  11. Sussexgardener

    Sussexgardener Gardener

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    Good idea! Get a lovely Augustifola Hidcote :)
     
  12. Alice

    Alice Gardener

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    Hello Blueroses. I would say if your lavender has gone - it's gone.
    Buy a new one and start again.
    No lavender expert here BUT for what it's worth
    don't plant the new lavender where it was before. As I understand it lavender gives off something which inhibits new lavender from growing there. I would choose a different spot.
     
  13. Blueroses

    Blueroses Gardener

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    Really? Right ok I will remember that. Thanks very much :)
     
  14. Sussexgardener

    Sussexgardener Gardener

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    Thanks for this thread - you've just given me an idea for a plant to replace a (now dead :( ) Rosemary. A compact Lavender will do nicely :)
     
  15. Blueroses

    Blueroses Gardener

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    Just off to 'google' Augustifola Hidcote :)
     

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