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What trees ???

Discussion in 'Trees' started by RowieW, Apr 23, 2018.

  1. RowieW

    RowieW Apprentice Gardener

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    Hello. Can anyone help please? I want to plant a couple of trees in a front garden. The house is a brisk 5 minute uphill walk from the estuary. It's breezy, to say the least!! I'm going to try to post some photos of trees that are used extensively around here on developments near the coast. They are not too big, and evergreen (which I'd prefer) and a nice shape. Can anyone identify them for me? Or suggest an alternative. It's not a big space, currently mostly laid to lawn which I don't have any affection for. The view from the front of the house is nothing much. Something that wasn't slow growing would be ideal (no spring chicken here so I can't wait for too many years). Thanks.

    image.jpgIMG_0011.JPG
     
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    • wiseowl

      wiseowl Friendly Owl Admin Staff Member

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      Good afternoon @RowieW and welcome to Gardeners Corner my friend,I am sure that one of our friends will be along shortly to answer your question:smile:
       
    • Tetters

      Tetters Total Gardener

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      Hello @RowieW :sign0016: to the forum. I`m afraid I can`t positively identify the trees you posted, but might be able to if you can photograph a close up of the leaves ...only might ;)

      First thoughts for evergreen trees for that position would have to be holly (Ilex) and there are several interesting varieties to check out, and Yew (Taxus baccata) Yew comes in all shapes, and you can choose from green or gold, rounded or fastiagata ( tall and skinny)
      The first choice though to put up with salty winds is Tamarix I think. It is deciduous, but very tough and pretty too when in flower - bees love it. Tamarix ramosissima rubra is worth checking out. The flowers are ruby red. There is a more easily found pink variety too, but I can`t remember its name. Maybe a mix would be more interesting than planting all the same, and it might be nice to mix in a few more flowering shrubs - like the viburnums.
       
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      • pete

        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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        For an evergreen tree I kind of like Arbutus , Strawberry tree, I find it reasonably slow growing and flowers and fruits well.
        Not sure how it stands up to salt winds though.

        I think we really need a close up of those trees in order to make a proper ID, leaves branches and flowers, if any, and fruits, if any.
        Most councils plant varieties of species trees, that way they know the ultimate growth habit.
         
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        • RowieW

          RowieW Apprentice Gardener

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          Hi @Tetters and thanks so much for your comments. I'll certainly take a look at your suggestions. I've got a couple of lovely holly trees at the back of the house, but there are also seedlings piping up in all sorts of random places. Could that be a disadvantage?
          Here's a pic of the leaves of of those trees. What do you think?IMG_0012.JPG
           
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          • RowieW

            RowieW Apprentice Gardener

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            IMG_0991.JPG
            Hi Pete. That's a stunning tree but checking it out, it needs a sheltered position and my front garden is anything but. It's in an elevated position near the top of a hill and gets salty sea winds
             
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            • Tetters

              Tetters Total Gardener

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              I think that the leaves look as if they belong to Eleagnus ebbingei. Often used for hedging, very strong growing. If it is Eleagnus, they must have been trained to grow as trees :scratch:
              [​IMG]Here`s another picture of E. ebbingei
               
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              • Tetters

                Tetters Total Gardener

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                That`s an interesting space to fill. If it was mine, I would get rid of the grass altogether - save mowing uphill :yikes:.... You could plant a fair few low growing flowering shrubs in there, and they would probably be more wind tolerant, as well as giving the possibility of a bit of colour.
                Is your soil acid or alkaline ?
                 
              • RowieW

                RowieW Apprentice Gardener

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                Well @Tetters, Eleagnus certainly scores for location location location. Just found this - apparently it's grafted onto a rootstock (she says, sounding like somebody who knows what she's talking about). Wouldn't want to do go about doing any topiary type performance though. Prefer au naturel
                IMG_1060.PNG
                 
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                • RowieW

                  RowieW Apprentice Gardener

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                  My thoughts exactly. Getting rid of the grass, I mean. Not a fan of lawns. Shrubs and trees do it for me. Will also help to disguise the odd shape and give me something nice to look out on.
                   
                • Tetters

                  Tetters Total Gardener

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                  How about first checking the soil ph - unless you already know, and then work on short tough shrubs that flower at different times - mixing those with a few evergreen ones in between.
                  Whatever you decide, please don`t forget to show us will you - please :)

                  Afterthought .... Hardy grasses would add nicely to the mix!!
                   
                • RowieW

                  RowieW Apprentice Gardener

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                  Have sent for a soil testing kit. Though not sure if I'm clued up enough to use the information when I've got it
                   

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