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Where to start?

Discussion in 'Edible Gardening' started by CoffeeKev, Jul 2, 2018.

  1. CoffeeKev

    CoffeeKev Apprentice Gardener

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    I am new so bear with me

    I want to grow different kinds of veg. I have the vegetable and herb expert book but still wondering where to start with my canvas...

    Shall I dig out everything till it is all soil and then buy young plants to make my plots?

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  2. kazzawazza

    kazzawazza Total Gardener

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    • CoffeeKev

      CoffeeKev Apprentice Gardener

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      Thanks

      Am I better off choosing the side that gets the most sun?
       
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      • Verdun

        Verdun Passionate gardener

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        Yes, go for the sunnier side CoffeeKev but research what every herb needs...some prefer slightly shadier spot :)

        You can buy herbs now however I would be inclined to do 2 things. Pot up your herbs. Thoroughly spend time digging and clearing your soil. Get some goodness in there. I would not rush this ....use the time now and the autumn to prepare your site. This patience and diligence will be worthwhile:)
         
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        • CoffeeKev

          CoffeeKev Apprentice Gardener

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          I've chatted to a landscape gardener and asked about doing a raised bed which seems to be the easiest solution the way the soil and rocks are. I think with that too at least I know I can buy decent soil to put in too

          I need a trip to local garden centre I think or nursery
           
        • Verdun

          Verdun Passionate gardener

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          Sounds good CoffeeKev :)
           
        • CoffeeKev

          CoffeeKev Apprentice Gardener

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          The soil is hard as hell full of stones and what looks like chunks of cement

          I'm thinking of renting a rotovator and then just doing both soil beds then I have the full lot to play with
           
        • Verdun

          Verdun Passionate gardener

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          CoffeeKev, a rotovator is not really the best way to do this in my opinion.

          Instead of trying to rush the job I would take my time and dig the soil over, slowly and surely. Does it matter if it takes some time to get it right? You will get rid of all the concrete, stones, etc. and end up with soil more easily worked. Then turn in some bulky organic matter to create a decent soil suitable for planting.

          Digging is far, far superior to using a rotovator CoffeeKev :)
           
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          • CoffeeKev

            CoffeeKev Apprentice Gardener

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            I am struggling getting a spade in. Shall I use a fork or soak the soil overnight?
             
          • Verdun

            Verdun Passionate gardener

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            No, dont soak. For me it made for muddy, messy work. A fork, a pick and hard work CoffeKev but do it slowly and thoroughly. I promise you, you will be glad you did it this way! It is also so satisfying! M Then use a spade and add compost for a glorious planting medium :)
             
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