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Why can't I grow beetroot?

Discussion in 'Edible Gardening' started by Plosh, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. Plosh

    Plosh Apprentice Gardener

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    I have been attempting to grow beetroot in my current location for 20 years. I have given it a miss a few times but have probably had about 15 attempts.
    Twice I have had a mammoth crop. The rest of the times nothing.
    I don't have a problem germinating the seed but once germinated they never seem to get past the 2 leaf stage - they will just sit like that for ever more. Occasionally they will progress a bit and I may end up with just a few skinny little roots. I've sown into beds and into modules. I've tried no end of varieties too.
    Does anyone have a secret for beetroot?
     
  2. Verdun

    Verdun Passionate gardener

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    Just an observation Plosh :)
    Beetroot is a maritime crop, likes being grown near the sea. For that reason, I apply a spray or two of seaweed. This was told to me years ago and it makes sense to me. I grow good beetroot here:)
    Beetroot needs a regular supply of water when growing and for the soil to be friable and stone free.
    I protect beetroot seedlings ...from seed sowing...with fleece. The seedlings can be easily damaged by heavy rain and wind so fleece supported by upturned plants pots protects them. Birds can also damage the brittle sedlings too with their movements.

    I thin out ......carefully...when very small. Sowing too early in cold areas too can be a problem :)
     
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    • JWK

      JWK Gardener

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      I've always found it straight forward and I've grown it on different soil types - heavy clay and light chalk so unless you have something unusual I should imagine it's down to providing enough feed. They do need top dressing, Grow More or whatever you might have with a bit of nitrogen in it. As well as keeping well watered as Verdun says.
       
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      • pete

        pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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        I'm still growing it, mainly because it's one of the easiest things to grow.;)
        I just add a bit of Fish blood and bone, before planting out from modules.

        I find direct sowing, although possible, and how i did it for many years, can get chewed off by slugs at the very early stages.
        I might water if it becomes very dry, but not as a rule.

        Only grow "boltardy"
         
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        • Plosh

          Plosh Apprentice Gardener

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          That's even more baffling if it's generally regarded as an easy crop. The soil in my raised beds is pretty good. 20 years of rotation and well rotted manure - it started off as clay with massive boulders in it that had to be removed by machine. Sufficient water should never be a problem, more likely to be too much. I will admit that once outdoor crops are in I don't usually feed (I use fish, blood and bone before planting)apart from the long stayers like sprouts.
           
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          • pete

            pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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            Well, to me it's pretty much the same stuff that they grow fields of for sugar, not exactly the same, but I find it doesn't need any messing around with.
            I cant grow carrots anymore, and I cant even grow spring onions to perfection.
            But Beetroot ............no problem.:smile:
             
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            • Plosh

              Plosh Apprentice Gardener

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              Carrots - no problem once germinated. Germination can sometimes be a bit challenging.
               
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