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Will these flower next year

Discussion in 'Herbs and Wildflowers' started by Paul Blackburn, Mar 24, 2018.

  1. Paul Blackburn

    Paul Blackburn Gardener

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    I am trying to create a small wild garden down the bottom of the garden and have planted the following flowers.Narcissus,Tulip,Dwarf Iris,Dwarf Daffodil,Scillia and Muscari.Have also got some rocks from the garden centre.Have also got some of these flowers in pots around the edge.Will I have to replant them next spring.
     
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    • BeeHappy

      BeeHappy Total Gardener

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      Hi Paul ...Lovely selection there :thumbsup: all the bulbs you have planted will return next spring and multiply in time - obviously subject to their growing conditions, the only one that might not flower over time is the Tulips as they need a warm sunny spot so they, unless they are species (wild), could be the one not to return.I always buy fresh tulip bulbs each Autumn for that very reason.
      I also buy ready potted dwarf bulbs this time of the year(Spring) and use them indoors on windowsills and then when they stop flowering pop them out into the garden for next years spring flowering too ...I find it's an easy and cheap way of adding to your spring display :spinning:
       
      Last edited: Mar 24, 2018
    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      Hiya Paul, all will reappear next spring and be even better year on year with one exception; tulips dont always appear again. Many gardeners regard them as expendable for this reason.

      However, I suggest digging up the tulips.....only after they have finished flowering and the foliage has died down. Dry them off and store in paper bags in cool dry place indoors. In autumn you can plant them again.....I find this a sure fire way to keep tulips from year to year.:)
       
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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      I find tulips do return, but not always as the original plant, they tend to revert if not species, but having said that they are all from some species or another, so they come back, but slightly different.
      I do agree though, they need more of a baking, than most bulbs, during the summer.
       
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      • Verdun

        Verdun Passionate gardener

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        For tulips I really value I take the trouble to lift; otherwise I let them taka a chance. Tulips I have had for many years do seem to return :)
         
      • redstar

        redstar Total Gardener

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        Time and money are important to me. I select bulbs that will endure the hardships of snow etc. I do not lift anything, and each year 100,000 come back or more of a vast variety. this year there is a large carpet of daffs that has been in that area for a good 14 years, unfortunately its time to thin those out a chore not liked. saw they did not bloom last year. so in May I have my task.
         
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        • BeeHappy

          BeeHappy Total Gardener

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          :goodpost:Agree @redstar I don't dig up any of my bulbs either, I would rather spoil myself with new ...as a matter of fact with most Tulip bulbs being so reasonably priced now I treat those bulbs like a bunch of flowers and think I would treat myself to fresh cut bouquet so why not new tulip bulbs in the Autumn :thumbsup:...that way Im not disappointed with them either not returning or no blooms and just having leaves taking up precious space :sad: Certainly not warm enough here to go through the hassle of digging them up and storing them. :) Good luck with your bulb dividing I certainly don't envy you that considerable task :love30:
           
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          • redstar

            redstar Total Gardener

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            @BeeHappy , with Tulip bulbs, have done research years back. As I deal with tall shade canopy of trees in various location around my property. I have to time, when the leaves appear on the trees, with the selection of the "earlier tulips" for that area, so those are up and done just as the leaves present themselves in full glory. Now the other locations down by the valley garden get the typical later type tulip, as there is a more open sky, less trees there. I actually find the early tulips prettier, and many of them also naturalize, where as the typical tall tulip later bloomer does not naturalize at all. BTW, I actually found a daff that is timed with the blooming of my star magnolia tree, white on the tree and yellow circle all under the tree to 5 foot dense out ward. its all about research and planning.
             
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            • redstar

              redstar Total Gardener

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              Thanks, the big issue is where to put them all. the area in question is size able right now, I am thinking 10 foot by 8 foot flooded with the bulbs. just tons of bulbs under there need to divide. I might give some to neighbors in the green and teach them how to plant them. over the years many of our spring tasks have been the thinning out of the bulbs.
               
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