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72 mini plugs arrived today, I am feeling overwhelmed!

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by Fflur, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Fflur

    Fflur Apprentice Gardener

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    I ordered these in April and I was told they would come in July. I have potted on 20 but not sure where to put them. Garden and gh too hot so somewhere in the house. The instructions say to water after planting by putting the in a tray of water until the compost darkens, but I did that a couple of hours ago and the compost is still dry it, may be a tiny bit darker but it still feels dry and powdery. I know they shouldn't be left in wet compost should I keep the pots standing in water or spray them with water or use a watering can with a rose. It is really hot here 25 in the shade.
     
  2. WeeTam

    WeeTam Total Gardener

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    I would spray them gently whilst sitting in a water tray. Leave till compost is wet then remove and place in light shade for a while so they dont get fried.
     
  3. Verdun

    Verdun Passionate gardener

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    FFlur :).

    Those you have potted on, can you create some shelter from the sun? Some fleece, a board overhead, anything to deflect the full heat of the sun whilst the plugs are recovering.

    Continue to soak the tray in water......even overnight if necessary....and then pot on into 9cm pots asap. Those plugs need to be rehydrated before you pot them on. Again, place these outside with protection from the direct heat of the sun.

    What plugs did you get, by the way?:)
     
  4. Fflur

    Fflur Apprentice Gardener

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    Thank you for reply.
    Wee Tam should I try to spray the stems or the leaves? Its a spray bottle with one fine hole rather than a mist. We have just assembled one of those mini greenhouse things, we won't use the plastic of course but I might be able to cover it with something. It's outside the kitchen in an enclosed yard so it doesn't get direct sun. It's warm everywhere of course.
    Verdun, I bought 72mixed hardy perennials. The note inside says ; coreopsis grandiflora, gaillardia messa, digitalis, scabiosa, lobelia and Echinacea but I can smell that some are lavender and some look like aqualegia. The plugs themselves don't look dehydrated but it's the dry compost I was concerned about, it looks better on some pots now but I think i may have to leave them overnight.
     

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    • Selleri

      Selleri Gardener

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      oooo... nice plants and plenty of them! Your garden will be a haven next summer! :spinning:

      Personally I'd pot them up and water gently from above with a small watering can so that the water will not squash the foliage but will wet the compost thoroughly. Alternatively, it's possible to stand the pots in a deep tray so that they are half way immersed for an hour or two, that should soak them up.

      In this warm weather my cuttings and young seedlings are outdoors, in a sheltered spot in moderate shade.

      The key is to keep the young plants comfy but not pampered, 20-ish Celsius heat and moist but not overly wet soil will give them a good environment to man up. Whether that's outdoors, or on windowsill depends on what you have. :)

      Welcome Fflur, keep us posted on the progress :sign0016:
       
    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      Try to establish what is what though Fflur. Lavendar, for example, will not like to be soaked at all. Quite a mix of perennials though and I would try to separate them out into their named groups and watch how they grow. Some will grow fast snd need repotting again; others more slowly:)
       
    • Fflur

      Fflur Apprentice Gardener

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      Thanks for replying. when I potted up I could see more varieties including dianthus, delphinium, rudbeckia and verbena bonariensis(?). I have put the plastic cover on now the temp has dropped , they are still standing in water, but I think i will taken them out of that for tonight.bv
      I finished them all, two were 'missing , at 10 pm. Being on the forum has helped immensely because I didn't get much information from the packaging or other websites. If I can succeed with these I will feel more confident taking my own cuttings and growing things from seed; lots of interesting things to learn!
       
    • Mike Allen

      Mike Allen Gardener

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      I share your delight at having your order fulfilled.

      Plugs usually are sold in three sizes. Small being in cells of about 1/4 inch sq. These require perhaps a bit more TLC as basically they are recently germinated seed. Especially under high temperatures such as we are experiencing, carefully unpack and stand the cell block in water, once totally moist stand and let drain.
      Preparation of basically potting on. Don't be over enthusiastic. 9cm pots are OK for the middle size plug. For the first size, either use seed trays spacing at 24 or better still, use cell trays of about 1" sq. Having filled whatever with compost, soak in water. The practice of soaking means. The outside water level should be equal to the compost level. Leave for a while until all air bubbles have gone. Lift out and allow to drain.
      Now using a thin pencil or such-like, insert the latter through the bottom of the cell and gently push the plug out. Using the same 'tool' make a hole in the cell compost pop the plug into it and gently firm the compost. Having done all this, a gentle overhead spraying can take place. This same procedure applies to all plugs plants. Obviously the larger, stage three plugs, are usually sold as, garden ready. It is wise to pot-on to 9cm at least and wait for favourable times to plant out. Keep the plants shaded at all times and provide lots of ventilation. Until the newly sited plants have settled down, water via soaking, in hot conditions, a gentle spray can help. I hope this info helps.
       
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      • Mervyn Wilmington

        Mervyn Wilmington Experienced Gardener

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        I had 72 perennial plugs (small cells) arrive the other day. Some plants were rather lanky. My standard procedure is gently to soak them in a sink before doing anything else. I get all my pots ready - not too big - and put the plugs into fairly generous 'holes' with the gentlest of compaction round them. The pots go into trays or baskets. I then spray them (out of the sun) with the finest of drizzles to the point of saturation. That includes lavenders. Although it is right that these will suffer if in 'water' for a long time, I always think it best to give them plenty at the outset lest there is inherent dryness after their journey.

        I place the trays tight under a north facing wall. There are some trees to the east. They will get a little sun first thing in the morning and late in the evening. Otherwise they will be shaded.

        Some of the ones I received were less than perfect: they should have been potted-on at least a week before. There will be some failures. I complained to the supplier, who has sent me a £5 voucher...

        I inspect them at least twice a day. Further watering will usually be in the late evening. I will pot-on when appropriate. I rarely plant into the garden until at a decent size. Supervision of pots - and any necessary action - is better that way than wandering round the garden.
         
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        • Fflur

          Fflur Apprentice Gardener

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          Thank you , I had no idea they were seedlings. I thought they were Jumbo plants, or garden ready. Over the phone they said I could plant them straight into the garden but they recommended potting them on first. I have sent off for a very fine plant mist, the only one I have to hand at the moment is a fine jet. When can I plant them out? In the spring? Keep lavender and dianthus ( when I can identify them) warmer and dryer over winter? I wish I knew a week ago I would have been far better prepared. There is little real deep shade at the moment but they are not in sunlight, even so the thermometer on their shelves say 30 c. Mervyn we probably have the same Plants!
           
        • Verdun

          Verdun Passionate gardener

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          Just dont be in a hurry to plant any of them out before next spring. Grow them on and you will be able to put sizeable plants out :)

          I'm not sure they are "seedlings". They are likely to be standard size plugs suitable for putting into 9cm pots fflur and should grow fast. For the future, plugs are prob better purchased in spring....no need to worry about over wintering. :)

          This heat is unlikely to last for too long so take it day by day
           
        • Mervyn Wilmington

          Mervyn Wilmington Experienced Gardener

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          I agree with Verdun. So far as the lavender and dianthus are concerned, they will withstand the winter, but need to be somewhere well drained, perhaps with some grit when finally planted out..

          I'm not sure we have the same mix - mine did not contain dianthus.

          Remember that that it may take quite a lot of mist and time to keep them watered, especially if they have got a little dry. Don't assume water has got well down. If in doubt, put the pots into a tray containing water for half an hour. However, there is a balance to be struck: you don't want them over-watered for long periods. Such is gardening!

          I have a mist off the main supply.
           
        • Mike Allen

          Mike Allen Gardener

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          Ah! Sorry for that, a slight misunderstanding. As no mention asto the actual size of the plugs. My comments were a generalization of basic treatment. I probably did mention the usual three sizes of plugs on offer. Apologoes for any misunderstanding etc. Best wishes.
           
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          • Mike Allen

            Mike Allen Gardener

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            LOL! Talking about lavender. Two to three years back I ordered some lavender plants from T&M's. They soon arrived packed in moulded plastic containers. Opening them up, I got a soaking. The plants were quite sturdy, being well rooted cuttings, well branched etc. Sadly they were in an advanced stage of rotting. Evidence was that they had been lifted and stored in water pending despatch, possibly having been given extra water for the journey. I immediately emailed and complained. Very soon I had a replacement order. Blow me down, exactly the same as before. Sonce then I have not traded with them.
             
          • Mervyn Wilmington

            Mervyn Wilmington Experienced Gardener

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            I buy quite a few plants by post. It is true that you can get horrors. When I do, I never hesitate to complain, and things usually work-out ok.

            But you can get very good plants too. I received six ground cover potted roses last week. First class plants in every way.
             

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