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Builders sand in the garden

Discussion in 'Gardening Discussions' started by Sirius, Jun 29, 2018.

  1. Sirius

    Sirius Total Gardener

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    I have recently had a brick bbq built.
    And now have about 1/3 of a ton bag of builders sand that I need to dispose of, as it wasn't all used.

    Was thinking of putting some of it in my raised beds
    Main concern is that the ph may be very alkaline.
    Or it may cause drainage problems.
    Or any other issues?
     
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    • JWK

      JWK Gardener

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      It may contain a lot of salt too.
      It will not be good for drainage in large quantities (obviously it's not the same as sharp sand which is sold as horticultural sand).
      Overall I think you could spread it thinly around the garden and get away with it, I would avoid any precious plants to begin with. Maybe try it on your lawn too? If you could leave it over winter exposed to the elements the rain would wash a lot of the potential salts out.
       
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      • Sirius

        Sirius Total Gardener

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        JWK,
        Thanks.

        My garden is full of precious plants - palms, tree ferns, ferns etc.

        Am not prepared to take the risk
        I will have to find another way of disposing of it
         
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        • JWK

          JWK Gardener

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          Freecycle it ?
           
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          • Verdun

            Verdun Passionate gardener

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            No, I would not use it in the garden :sad:
            Only materials that improve the quality of my soil are added :)
             
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            • ricky101

              ricky101 Super Gardener

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              Hi,

              Have previously tested the PH of various sands with a proper PH meter and building sand is a real danger to the gardener as the ph content is very high.

              Also the Sharp sands sold by many of the bigger names is now more like crushed concrete than what it used to be and equally has a very high ph.

              Some smaller yards do sell 'grit' or 'sharp' or 'river' sand that is and looks like proper sand/grit from river beds etc and the ones I have locally were quiet neutral.

              If using sand for potting mixes, lawns or special plants in the garden then suggest you buy the larger sacks of Horticultural sand from the garden centers.
               
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              • pete

                pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                If its soft sand, the type used for brick laying then I'd be inclined to get rid of it.

                Never had a problem with sharp sand from builders, even builders have standards, and salt is not allowed as far as I know, and it only becomes alkaline when you add the cement ;)

                I've even used ballast for potting up agaves etc. with no problems.

                Horticultural sand is pretty much a rip off as far as I'm concerned.
                 
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