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Climate change and wildlife.

Discussion in 'Wildlife Corner' started by Mike Allen, Aug 31, 2018.

  1. Mike Allen

    Mike Allen Gardener

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    The hollies locally are already laden with ripe berries, way before time. Although the greedy wood pigeons usually have their fill, these food larders are eagerly visited by visiting Redwings and Fieldfares. I wonder if the visitors natural know how, will automaticaly adapt.

    Also over recent years. Our cheeky sparrows have disappeared, also the swallows and martins. I can't remember the last time I saw a song or mistle thrush.
     
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    • Kandy

      Kandy Will be glad to see the sun again soon.....

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      You can have some of our sparrows (house) Mike as we have masses of them.Because I feed them all year round they have made the most of it and with the hot summer have bred like mad.Hubby took a photo of them feeding on and around my bird table in the back garden the other day and he reckons there were over sixty of them:hapydancsmil: . Costing us a fortune in seed though:biggrin:.

      Our allotment Hollies have berries that are just turning red but I can’t remember when they normally turn that colour in the wild.

      We have now lost the Swallows from our village although the House Martins are doing well.Had a Song Thrush in the garden earlier in the year but our blackbird saw it off so it has given up trying to feed.:sad:

      Likely say there certainly isn’t the amount of birds around like there were when we were kids.I lived in a terraced house in a town and every roof in the street had sparrows nesting in them but I think now they have even disappeared :sad:

      Will be interesting to see if we get the Fieldfares/Redwings later this year like they seemed to be last year as we usually see the first ones in September:smile:
       
    • NigelJ

      NigelJ Total Gardener

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      I saw an article a while ago linking sparrow decline to the increase in diesel vehicles in London, maybe coincidence.
      I haven't seen swallows, house martins or bats around my house for a long time. I know a meadow or two a few miles away where they still swoop over the meadows.
      What I do notice is the fall in insect numbers even since the 80's possibly due to climate change, but also related to changes in agricultural practice. Not necessarily pesticides, but more the rise of monocultures, the switch to autumn sowing and the loss of species rich meadows. One example of this is the use of drugs to protect animals from internal parasites, these are excreted and continue to work in the droppings affecting dung beetles and flies that would normally feed on these and remove them. Net result cow pats last longer and fewer insects.
       
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      • wiseowl

        wiseowl Friendly Owl Admin Staff Member

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        Good morning I 'm not sure we can blame climate change,its the destruction of the countryside here in kent, we have blackbirds,song and mistle thrushes,sparrows by the hundreds,starlings also,goldfinches,bluetits,robins,and many many magpies,the one bird I personally miss is the skylark a distant memory from the past:smile:
         
      • Jiffy

        Jiffy The Match is on Fire

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        Also, cow poo don't smell like cow poo
        I don't think it's clmate change, more of man changing things
        swallows few,only 4 when we used to have thousands here :sad:
        Honey bee's, what honey bee's not seen one this year, but lots of Bubble bee's
        The last 4 years not many fies but this year hundreds
         
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          Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
        • Kandy

          Kandy Will be glad to see the sun again soon.....

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          When we go away on holiday we always take a notebook each and record the bird and animal life that we see when we are out and about.I do mine as a holiday tick list but Mr Kandy does his for every place we visit whilst on holiday so we make a mental note of the birds we have seen then update it of an evening.We have been doing this ever since we have been together and we can look back at the holidays we have been on years ago and compare the lists of what birds new or old that we no longer see or ones that have now made their home in a particular place...eg We used to only see Buzzards when going up to Scotlandfor our holidays in the early part of our marriage so new that we would only see them once we crossed the border,now we can see Buzzards all over the place as they have now spread out far and wide.Same with Red Kites,we had to go all the way to Wales to see them but since reintroductions at various sites I can now stand at my kitchen sink and see them flying past:yay:

          We can now go to places where we never see Starlings,or even Collared Doves whereas round here there are plenty of them and in the spring and summer months we stop and listen to the Skylarks singing their hearts out as they go higher and higher into the sky:biggrin:

          Loss of habitat is definetley having an effect on bird and wildlife plus as others have said farming practises have a lot to answer for.

          Also a lot of migrant birds are either being trapped or shot at in European Countries as they enjoy either eating them or killing them for sport.So the birds make their long journeys south to spend the winter where there are insects a plenty and it is warmer and then have to do it all over again on the way back to this country so have to endure the guns and sticky traps all over again:sad:

          We also noticed this year on our allotment plots that there hasn’t been the quantity of bees and butterflies feeding on my butterfly bushes unlike other years when the bushes were covered in them.Things are certainly going down hill and I don’t know what the answer is:scratch:
           
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          • wiseowl

            wiseowl Friendly Owl Admin Staff Member

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            Hello @Kandy my friend that's it rub it in :heehee:can you get me a recording of the skylarks please;),as I used to lay in the field (on my own of course) looking up at the sky with my eyes closed,such bliss and relaxing:smile:
             
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