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Cordyline ID ?

Discussion in 'Identification Area' started by HarryS, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. HarryS

    HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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    I normally log the name of new plants I buy , but this Cordy I bought last spring has slipped through my system ! It has overwintered extremely well , unlike my Cordy Southern Splendour which is looking very tatty. As shown in the photos it is green with an attractive yellow stripe down the leaves . I'd like to buy another if anyone can assist with the ID :blue thumb:
    TIA

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    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      IMG_3543.JPG Harry, the nearest I have to that is this C. Albertii. A bit tatty from last week's snow and cold but recovers well in late spring. Has delightful variegation. Now some 20 years old :)
       
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      • Silver surfer

        Silver surfer PLANTAHOLIC

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        Harry from your pic it looks as if you have Corydaline australis.

        Cordyline 'Australis' 5L

        There are many named forms/cultivars...eg Verdun has Cordyline australis Albertii.

        Cordyline australis Albertii. - Google Search:

        It is a striking variegated form of Cordyline australis that forms dense clusters of arching, sword-like leaves at the end of the stems that are dark green with a pink midrib and creamy yellow edges. ..very different from what you are trying to buy.

        See this link to see some of the named ones now available.

        CORDYLINE -
         
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        • HarryS

          HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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          @Silver surfer , @Verdun , thanks for the advice on the Cordy names and types . It does seem to be the Cordy Australis . I was impressed on how it has survived over this quite harsh winter . Far better than the red coloured Southern splendour I have . Going to stick to the "greeny" types in future , they do seem a lot hardier :blue thumb:
           
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          • strongylodon

            strongylodon Old Member

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            The Range had a 'white' variety of Cordyline australis due to the 'Beast from the East' they were barely a foot high and far to small to be sold, everyone had collapsed, all the Loropetalum had turned brown too as they are not fully hardy either.:frown:

            My Cordyline Sunrise, similar to Southern Splendour and Torbay Dazzler have survived the snow and ice only because I tied them up.
             
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            • HarryS

              HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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              I had a Torbay Dazzler a few years back and tied it up , not to tight to allow a bit of air circulation. Blooming thing started to rot ! I'll stick to the hardier green varieties now.
               
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              • Verdun

                Verdun Passionate gardener

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                New named varieties appearing all the time many of which are very tender. I have two red cordylines, names long forgotten, and they do well here too
                Pink Passion is a lovely looking plant I planted in a friend's garden a couple of years ago. I think its hardiness is suspect though even though this garden is a stone's throw from St. Michael's Mount and the coast so very mild :)
                Most need to be planted in sun and well drained soil; in containers a generous incorporation of gravel is important
                 
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                • strongylodon

                  strongylodon Old Member

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                  I have lost a couple of Red Star in the past but around Poole and Bournemouth a few miles away which are milder than here, there are many purple ones and Torbay Dazzler over 10ft high.
                  I only tie mine up for a few days at a time if it is going below -3c.
                   
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                  • HarryS

                    HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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                    Sun and drainage is not a problem , they are in containers . For gravel would some pea gravel be OK mixed in with the JI ? I normally mix grit sand into my containers . Horticultural grit as beloved by Monty Don not sure how to obtain it . Seen it in GCs small bags for £6 a go !
                     
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                    • pete

                      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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                      I've found with growing cordylines in containers the biggest problem is they fill the pot with roots so quickly, and become starved unless you feed them very well.

                      I tend to think also that container growing is best done for only a couple of years or so at the most, after that they get top heavy, if growing well, and become a problem.

                      Ordinary builder sharp sand is good for providing a bit of drainage in the compost, I'd use equal amounts of MP and JI no3 with some sand.

                      Drainage will not be the problem after the first year, getting enough water into the pot will be.:biggrin:
                       
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                      • Verdun

                        Verdun Passionate gardener

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                        Yes it would be fine Harry.......Ive used it (pinched from the beach when it wasnt forbidden!) mixed in and as a thick mulch. For me, cordylines in containers are rarely if ever watered :)
                        Just read Pete's post.......cordylines in pots seem to last several years in my pots simply because I dont feed or water. Foliage seems to have better colour too
                         
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                          Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
                        • HarryS

                          HarryS Eternally Optimistic Gardener

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                          Agree with you there @pete . For container Cordylines , maybe 3 seasons ( two winters ! ) is OK before they get too big and gangly . As I don't have a suitable bed to plant them on , I'll buy new and dump the old one .
                          @Verdun , you seem to have digressed onto Phormiums :snorky: I agree they do keep better in a large container than planted in the ground . You find new housing developments plant Phormiums near the show house / sales office . After a few years thay can grow very large and look a bit tatty.
                           
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                          • Verdun

                            Verdun Passionate gardener

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                            Sorry HarryS.....meant to say cordylines not phormiums :) have edited it now

                            However about phormiums, I divide them every 2 or 3 years to keep them young. Every spring I remove old foliage and dead leaves. So many phormiums are allowed to develop into overly large ugly plants that lose their colour that are then almost impossible to remove.
                             
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                              Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
                            • strongylodon

                              strongylodon Old Member

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                              I have a clump forming Cordyline, 'Can Can' (which looks like a Phormium) in the greenhouse as it is, sadly frost tender and as we still have more cold weather coming it will have to stay inside which, in a way, defeats the object of having one unless living in a frost free climate.
                               
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                              • Gail_68

                                Gail_68 Beauty blooms in the garden as well as the heart.

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                                I do know this one out growed it's pot with in a year of buying it :scratch:...soon went in the garden :)....i know it's a different genetic plant but the size of the pot according to the person at the garden centre said it would do 3yrs...that was a :snorky:

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