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Covering a fence with a climber

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Jack Sparrow, Jan 8, 2019.

  1. Jack Sparrow

    Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

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    20181013_175348.jpg
    This year I am thinking of covering the back fence with a climbing plant. My local garden centre has both vitis and parthenocissus. The write ups sound similar. Are there any pros or cons of either over the other.

    In the summer that area is in dappled shade in the morning and in full sun in the afternoon.

    G.
     
  2. Verdun

    Verdun Passionate gardener

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    Why those climbers Gary?
    Summer Jasmine? Tracholespemum? :)
    Rather than go for something the GC has why not decide what you really want and source it ?:)
     
  3. noisette47

    noisette47 Total Gardener

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    Agree with Verdun. There are lots of far more attractive climbers which won't leave the fence looking deadly for a good part of the year. First step, though, is to get a good, strong support system fixed up. Whether it's screws and wires or netting, strong trellis or chicken wire....if you give your climber(s) a helping hand initially, it saves a lot of heartache and soil trampling afterwards.
     
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    • silu

      silu gardening easy...hmmm

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      I grow both Vitis and Parthenocissus, I am very much more a foliage/form person than flowers hence why I like both but do also grow lots of Clematis and other flowering climbers.
      The 2 you are asking about are quite different. The Vitis is not self climbing on the likes of a fence as it twines and therefore needs strong wires or similar. The Parthenocissus is self supporting once it gets going. It is also much faster growing. Both grow well in shade altho they both colour better in sun.
      The variety Parthenocissus Henryana is nicer than Quinquefolia which is more readily available. Looking at the height of your fence unless trained sideways certainly the Parthenocissus would reach the top of your fence during a season once established so you would need to keep pruning it. I grow it up the side of my house and just chop it down to about head height during the winter, It then grows back up to near the roof every year. As long as you keep it in check it really isn't much trouble to keep under control. The Vitis does get a bit of die back during the winter as it's not as tough. The leaves are huge and go a great maroon colour in autumn unlike the Parthenocissus which goes scarlet. I know this will probably cause shock and horror but do consider 1 of the small leaved variegated ivies. Slowish growing. self supporting NOT a thug and brightens up a dark area very nicely. I grow lots over less than attractive walls and onto paths. I think they look really nice and they grow where other things might struggle. When I do my plant sale 1 of the most popular things I sell is the variegated Ivy as people see it doing a great job hiding less than lovely looking bits of my garden and it gives them the idea of how it would help their gardens.
       
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        Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
      • Verdun

        Verdun Passionate gardener

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        I think noisette has nailed a good few points there.:)
        I have just put up supports for a climber for my niece.....strong galvanised screw eyes and galvanised wire. The supports look neat now but wont be seen when the climber has grown more.
        For me, an evergreen neat scented climber would look good there:)
         
      • Jack Sparrow

        Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

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        I intend to paint the fence and cover it with chicken wire before I do anything. In the middle of the picture is a baby crabapple tree which will in time fill that space. When it does that fence will be in full shade or dappled shade depending on the time of day. In winter it is pretty much in full shade all the time.

        I like the idea of the autumn reds. One thing does concern me though is that the existing trees (above the photos) are deciduous, as will be the crab apple. A red climber might get lost rather than harmonise.

        I'm not really decided whether I want to go to all that trouble at all.

        G.
         
      • noisette47

        noisette47 Total Gardener

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        Well there's à surprise :lunapic 130165696578242 5:
         
      • Verdun

        Verdun Passionate gardener

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        Chicken wire sometimes makes it difficult to grow plants through it though Gary.....simple single galvanised wires are very effective.
        Is this the same fence you considered jasminjum nudiflorum for? The winter flowering jasmine? This would be fine there and provide evergreen foliage as well
         
      • Jack Sparrow

        Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

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        @Verdun Not the same fence.

        20190105_141026.jpg
        The jasmine is already in place. This is the view from the kitchen window. At the moment its very dull. I have made steps to brighten it up.

        The fence at the end of the garden isn't such an eyesore but it might be nice to liven it up a bit. I want something that would cover it quickly and look good now. I also want something that will stay looking good in 5 years time when the crab apple tree has filled out. There is spring and summer colour in that area already. I would like some autumn colour too.

        For reference, the local garden centre does have jasmines and clematis and honeysuckle and all the different climbers I might want to choose. The difficulty is choosing which one.

        G.
         
      • Verdun

        Verdun Passionate gardener

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        Ah yes! Looks good :). Winter jasmine fills in quickly but if you lower one stem to the ground and pin it down it will root very quickly. Then sever it and plant alongside for double coverage(?)
        Tracholespermum has reddish/copper autumn hues on evergreen foliage !
        Honeysuckles are great but they are offen very different in their vigour, flowering habit, soil and moisture requirement and some are scented some are not thus researching them to match to your situation is advisable.:)
         
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        • Freddy

          Freddy Miserable git, well known for it

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          Not sure this fella would actually cover it...

          C7429C08-B601-4948-9205-8341775207D1.jpeg

          Oh, not that sort of climber...:biggrin:

          I’ll get me coat... >>>>>
           
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          • noisette47

            noisette47 Total Gardener

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            Dammit! If I'd got a fence I wouldn't mind one of those :heehee:
             
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            • Vince

              Vince Not so well known for it.

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              Perhaps an edible climber? Cucamelon comes to mind.
               
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              • Selleri

                Selleri Gardener

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                Lonicera Henryi is evergreen, does well in dappled shade and is a very healthy and vigorous plant. It has a tendency to go top heavy when it reaches the top of the wall but it's quite attractive when the long wisps sway in the wind. Flowers and berries are a bonus.

                Morrison's usually have it in stock in spring for a pound or so :cool:
                 
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                • Jack Sparrow

                  Jack Sparrow Total Gardener

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                  I have looked at Lonicera Henryi Copper Beauty for the mostly west/slightly south facing side of my shed. I know where I can get that locally.

                  G.
                   

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