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Help with my poorly Cordyline please !!

Discussion in 'General Gardening Discussion' started by Sam Halls, Apr 19, 2017.

  1. Sam Halls

    Sam Halls Apprentice Gardener

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    IMG_1475.JPGIMG_1476.JPGIMG_1477.JPGIMG_1478.JPG
    Evening All ,
    Just joined the the Gardeners Corner in the hope any of you would be kind enough to give me advice / help with my favourite plant .
    Up until a few weeks ago it was beautiful and green , the yellowing blotchy leaves are now rapidly moving up the plant and I've noticed the tips are all dry , even the newest leaves . I haven't watered for a while as I think I killed my red one last year by over watering , my little gadget that checks moisture in the pot is saying it's moist .
    I took a leaf into my local garden centre and the young man said to plant it in the garden , if I do it will have to be in a mostly shaded area.
    Hopefully someone can give me some idea what to do , I would be so sad to lose it
    Thank you in advance , and sorry about the pics coming before the questions, it's my first post ☺️
     
  2. pamsdish

    pamsdish Total Gardener

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    Mine are looking a bit sick too, hope it`s not a repeat of that virus that killed such a lot about 8 years ago.
     
  3. pete

    pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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    Lower leaves die off naturally as you probably know, so nothing to worry about the ones around the lower end.
    .
    I'm tending to think the bloke at the garden centre was right, it needs to go in the ground, they can only really be used as a pot plant for a limited time, after which they get badly pot bound and starved.

    Watering is also a problem as the pot contains more root than compost once they reach that size.

    Dont know where you live or how cold you get in winter, but I would go for a sunny spot, and soak the rootball well before planting.
    Then water well and deeply all this summer.
     
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    • kindredspirit

      kindredspirit Gardening around a big Puddle. :)

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      Yep. Take it out of the pot immediately and plant it in the ground. Soak it well.
       
    • NCFCcrazy

      NCFCcrazy Super Gardener

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      That pots far too small for a plant of its size, they have quite an extensive root system of thick roots so need room to grow. I suspect you may need to break the pot to get it out.
       
    • Sam Halls

      Sam Halls Apprentice Gardener

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      Thank you all very much for your help
       
    • ARMANDII

      ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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      I agree with pete, it's natural for the bottom foilage to go brown, but probably part of the problem is too much water and cold.
      Shiney gave me a Cordyline a couple of years that he had rescued from a neighbour who had her gardener dig it up with instructions to put it in the bin. It wasn't in a pot but lying in a barrow with bare roots, looking sad and very limp. I put it in a sheltered position in my sandy soil garden and it has recovered and looking fairly happy.
      [​IMG]
       
    • pete

      pete Growing a bit of this and a bit of that....

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      I remember that one @ARMANDII, I think it was a Yucca.;):smile:
       
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      • ARMANDII

        ARMANDII ADMINISTRATOR Staff Member

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        True, pete, sorry I was trying to make a comparison but my brain did a mental flip with the names:dunno::doh::wallbanging::snorky:
         
      • Verdun

        Verdun Head Gardener

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        Firstly avoid the temptation to water it.
        Cordylines are fine in pots...they simply grow more slowly that's all. Plus the architectural quality is enhanced in pots in my opinion.
        However, a larger pot would be my next move.
        Sam, I suspect you have used ordinary mpc which is not really satisfactory. Use a john Innes compost when you repot and I would add 20% perlite.
        Site it in the warmest sunniest spot you have.
        Cordylines want to make trees and to lose their lower leaves thus forming bare trunks. Growing in containers minimises this behaviour and keeps cordylines youthful for longer in my opinion:)
         
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