1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Is this Box blight?

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by Outlander, Jul 13, 2018.

  1. Outlander

    Outlander Gardener

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2018
    Messages:
    105
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +161
    Hi all.

    I have two Box plants in containers and have had them just under a year. They are kept in light shade have always been side by side and are always watered at the same time.
    Suddenly, one has changed colour, the leaves have turned very pale but are not dead or crispy. The other one has signs of the same thing but only a small area.

    Does this look like Box blight or is there perhaps some other explanation?


    Thank you.

    P1010680.JPG


    P1010681.JPG
     
  2. WeeTam

    WeeTam Total Gardener

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2015
    Messages:
    1,637
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +3,306
    :shocked:





    Something else i think. If it was blight i would expect to see blotches on the leaves and black streaks on the stems.
    Have been hit in the past by it. Now i dont prune till September earliest.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Marley Farley

      Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

      Joined:
      May 11, 2005
      Messages:
      28,581
      Occupation:
      Gardener Councillor Governor Homemaker
      Location:
      Under the Edge Zone 8b
      Ratings:
      +10,182
      No definitely not box blight @Outlander I think maybe:-

      The soft, new growth on box can be very susceptible to frost damage;
      those young leaves turn white and translucent. The frost damaged
      growth is often thought to be box blight .. We had those late frosts and winds from Siberia do t forget.. sadly it is most often seen on low, flat-topped hedges or ball shapes that have been stimulated into growth by early trimming. Remember to trim at the right time which would be now in midsummer.
      Maintain good air circulation around them. It is also important to remove fallen leaves from the top of box hedges in autumn and winter; these can cause die-back and weaken the plants..

      It could also be down to a potassium deficiency so feed tomato food

      The only other thing i can think it might be is root rot and Box can suddenly develop it and there is no come back from that..
       
    • Outlander

      Outlander Gardener

      Joined:
      Mar 13, 2018
      Messages:
      105
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +161
      I'm wondering if I over watered. I might have got a bit carried away considering all my other plants are in full sun whereas these are in shade.:frown:
       
    • Outlander

      Outlander Gardener

      Joined:
      Mar 13, 2018
      Messages:
      105
      Gender:
      Male
      Ratings:
      +161
      @Marley Farley

      I seem to remember they had been trimmed when I bought them and the leaves have been falling off ever since. So far, I have not trimmed them myself but will do so now and feed with Tomorite. It happened almost over night tbh.
       
    • Marley Farley

      Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

      Joined:
      May 11, 2005
      Messages:
      28,581
      Occupation:
      Gardener Councillor Governor Homemaker
      Location:
      Under the Edge Zone 8b
      Ratings:
      +10,182
      Could be they don’t like to have soggy roots which could induce root rot
      When it comes to identifying root rot, look at the plants. Plants with root rot can’t absorb moisture and nourishment from the soil properly. The plants often resemble those suffering from drought and stress and mineral deficiencies. Signs of root rot in garden plants include stunting, wilting and discolored leaves. Foliage and shoots die back and the entire plant soon dies. If you pull up a plant with root rot, you will see that the roots are brown and soft instead of firm and white.
      Click to expand...​
      Or could be winter damage showing now as stressed.? I think I might be inclined to have a look at the roots then if sudden..
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
      • WeeTam

        WeeTam Total Gardener

        Joined:
        Mar 9, 2015
        Messages:
        1,637
        Gender:
        Male
        Ratings:
        +3,306
        Heatstroke,seriously. New soft leaves exposed to unusual heat.
         
      • Outlander

        Outlander Gardener

        Joined:
        Mar 13, 2018
        Messages:
        105
        Gender:
        Male
        Ratings:
        +161
        Thanks @Marley Farley. I think I will have a look at the roots first and see whats happening and then decide whether to cut my losses or not.
         
        • Like Like x 1
        • Outlander

          Outlander Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 13, 2018
          Messages:
          105
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +161
          Thanks @WeeTam

          I did wonder about that too, a few plants have gone a bit pale in this heat, that's why I have kept the box in the shade. I did lose another box plant early on which was in full sun.
           
        • Outlander

          Outlander Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 13, 2018
          Messages:
          105
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +161
          As an update, I discovered that the roots were indeed soggy. I tried to save the plant but alas had to throw it out in the end. The other one is still fine and I water it maybe once a week if it's lucky.

          :biggrin:
           
          • Like Like x 1

          Share This Page