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Moved roses to new house - prune this winter?

Discussion in 'Roses' started by tim091, Sep 3, 2018.

  1. tim091

    tim091 Apprentice Gardener

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    With great trepidation I dug up my seven roses to move to a new house (well, garden to be more precise).

    They were about three years established in the old garden.

    It has been six weeks since I planted them in the new garden and after initial complete leaf browning and dropping they are all now showing healthy shoots, and even a rose!

    Phew, looks like they have survived! But I had to prune them pretty hard to move and then to tidy up the dead wood after so I wonder if I should go for the usual hard prune in Feb/March or leave them be?
     
  2. Clare G

    Clare G Super Gardener

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    Welcome to Gardeners' Corner and well done on moving them successfully!

    I would leave them be myself, apart from giving them a good feed when they start to get going next spring.
     
  3. wiseowl

    wiseowl Friendly Owl Admin Staff Member

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    Good morning @Tim Shields I would check on their growth in Feb/March and then lightly prune and tidy them up removing any deadwood and crossed canes to an accepted shape :smile:
     
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    • tim091

      tim091 Apprentice Gardener

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      Thanks both for your replies. I am inclined to leave them be to "get over their ordeal", but as they are showing such strong signs of growth I will probably play it by ear and see how they are looking in Feb.

      The soil here is terrible - flint and clay - so I planted them in deep trenches filled with manure and rose compost mixed. It was the hottest day of the century when I planted them so much watering followed!
       
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