1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. November Photo Comp is now open with a great new theme.! Come and join in.
    Dismiss Notice

Planting a Juneberry tree in a container.

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by Outlander, Oct 26, 2018.

  1. Outlander

    Outlander Gardener

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2018
    Messages:
    115
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +165
    Hi all

    I have recently acquired an Amelanchier Alnifolia Obelisk (Juneberry) which is a smallish tree. The original plan was to plant directly in the ground but I am a bit worried about the height after ten years or so. Anyway, have decided that it might be better to try it in a large container (barrel) first and see how we get on with it.

    The planting instructions for planting in the ground say a hole should be dug to the depth of the root and twice as wide. If I do in fact plant into a container, which soil should I use? Would it be best to use mainly top soil with a bit of compost or completely in compost? Obviously compost would not be a stable as compacted soil and it would not be in a hole dug to the depth of the root ball. The plant going in is approximately six feet tall and a few twigs wide.

    Am I over thinking it? Should I just shove it in a container and hope for the best? :scratch:

    Any suggestions appreciated.

    My second question is, Will I ever get out of the new to gardening section? :biggrin:
     
  2. Marley Farley

    Marley Farley Affable Admin! Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2005
    Messages:
    28,728
    Occupation:
    Gardener Councillor Governor Homemaker
    Location:
    Under the Edge Zone 8b
    Ratings:
    +10,484
    Hi @Outlander Well it is a tree, so I would start it off in a minimum of a 50litre pot, but bigger if poss, but I think it might outgrow it very quickly.. I would plant it in John innes No.3..

    I had thought about getting one, but fear it would grow to big too quickly for where I was thinking of putting it.. You can eat the fruits of a Juneberry too so I am told.. ;)
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Tetters

      Tetters Gardener

      Joined:
      Apr 25, 2017
      Messages:
      2,195
      Gender:
      Female
      Location:
      Kent
      Ratings:
      +5,139
      The Amelanchiers are all small trees, and the variety you have @Outlander is a slender tree/shrub which can be lightly pruned during the winter - spring months. These are very suitable for small gardens, and would be happiest if they go into the ground rather than confined to a pot.
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
      • Outlander

        Outlander Gardener

        Joined:
        Mar 13, 2018
        Messages:
        115
        Gender:
        Male
        Ratings:
        +165
        Yes, that's hat concerns me too, I wouldn't want it to start doing well, only to be chopped down in the future.
         
        • Friendly Friendly x 1
        • Outlander

          Outlander Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 13, 2018
          Messages:
          115
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +165
          I suppose I have trouble visualising it, it can grow to 18ft tall which is probably too big for the area. I could keep it small by pruning but I thought it was not a good idea to cut the main upright stem. I think I need to do some photoshopping to get an idea what it will look like in say 10 years.

          Thanks @Tetters
           
        • Outlander

          Outlander Gardener

          Joined:
          Mar 13, 2018
          Messages:
          115
          Gender:
          Male
          Ratings:
          +165
          Thanks for recommending JI No3 @Marley Farley
           
          • Like Like x 1
          • Tetters

            Tetters Gardener

            Joined:
            Apr 25, 2017
            Messages:
            2,195
            Gender:
            Female
            Location:
            Kent
            Ratings:
            +5,139
            upload_2018-10-27_20-12-5.jpeg Let me try to explain @Outlander.... If you plant a columnar tree like this one in a small garden, it will do little or no damage with its roots, as they are generally as spread out as the bowl of the tree itself. You therefore achieve a lovely tall tree giving height and splendour to your garden without damaging foundations or drains - unless you plant it directly over the drains of course (which you wouldn`t) Not only that, because it is columnar (obelisk) shape it will cast very little shade - so after 10 years it will grow to about 24 feet, look lovely in each season and give you no grief whatsoever. If I were you I`d give it a go - it is such a good choice in your situation. :phew:
             
            • Agree Agree x 1
            • Informative Informative x 1
            • Outlander

              Outlander Gardener

              Joined:
              Mar 13, 2018
              Messages:
              115
              Gender:
              Male
              Ratings:
              +165
              Thanks @Tetters tht is certainly a lovely looking tree. I'm having a think.
               

            Share This Page