1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Following recent events, the Admin Team have a message for all members, which we hope will give some explanation and information.

    We would be grateful if you could take the time to have a read. Thank you.

    Click Here For More Info
    Dismiss Notice

THE VEGETABLE GROWING THREAD 2018

Discussion in 'Edible Gardening' started by ARMANDII, Jan 1, 2018.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Scrungee

    Scrungee Well known for it

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Messages:
    13,971
    Location:
    Central England on heavy clay soil
    Ratings:
    +22,597
    Put my Autumn planting garlic (Germidour) in this afternoon.

    Yet again I've lost quite a bit of my saved stock for replanting to white rot, so don't trust any of it. I might be moving to a new plot in a year's time and I don't want to take the white rot with me, so I bought 4 bulbs from Wilkos and planted 60 cloves in containers full of Jack's Magic to produce new desease free stock. Will probably do the same again in Spring.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • misterQ

      misterQ Keen Gardener

      Joined:
      Aug 25, 2015
      Messages:
      433
      Gender:
      Male
      Location:
      Stamford Hill, London N16 6RU
      Ratings:
      +1,214
      Harvested the last of the peppers on Friday.
      [​IMG]

      Some of them came from this over-wintered plant.
      [​IMG]
       
      • Like Like x 4
      • Scrungee

        Scrungee Well known for it

        Joined:
        Dec 5, 2010
        Messages:
        13,971
        Location:
        Central England on heavy clay soil
        Ratings:
        +22,597
        Did you get a better crop from an established plant compared to new plants from seeds? I've seen it suggested by growers who want to get record size peppers that overwintered plants are best.
         
      • shiney

        shiney President, Grumpy Old Men's Club Staff Member

        Joined:
        Jul 3, 2006
        Messages:
        39,813
        Gender:
        Male
        Occupation:
        Retired - Last Century!!!
        Location:
        Herts/Essex border. Zone 8b
        Ratings:
        +64,043
        All veg growing here has come to an end apart from the chillies, in the greenhouse, which are still going strong. The Shiney Hybrids are doing brilliantly and the couple of plants that have had all their chillies removed and eaten are back in production. The last of the Nagas are all getting to the selling stage with, I think, only five left. At least one is scheduled to be sold today. I'll check to see whether another might also be ready. They leave home when there are at least 15 fruit on them with lots of flowers. It's up to the purchasers to treat them well enough to be able to bring the flowers into fruit.
         
      • misterQ

        misterQ Keen Gardener

        Joined:
        Aug 25, 2015
        Messages:
        433
        Gender:
        Male
        Location:
        Stamford Hill, London N16 6RU
        Ratings:
        +1,214
        No, not the way I did it. I pruned the tops and the roots hard before repotting them into much smaller pots since I didn't have the space for anything larger.

        This meant that the plants had to regrow the feeder roots before doing anything else so fruit production was adversely affected.

        However, I do know from past experience that if you leave the established roots alone, fruit production does become more consistent in size and shape and, in a good year, the number increases too.
         
        • Like Like x 1
        • Informative Informative x 1
        • Useful Useful x 1
        Thread Status:
        Not open for further replies.

        Share This Page