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What to do with ugly border at end of the garden

Discussion in 'NEW Gardeners !' started by sandhun, May 9, 2018.

  1. sandhun

    sandhun Gardener

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    At the bottom of my garden I have a border which is the full length of the fence (around 5-6 metres) and about 30cm deep.

    Currently this area comprises of a mixture of dead leaves, soil, a handful of weeds/wild flowers, some bamboo which has been cut back, a series of large ornamental stones, lots of smaller pebbles and a random pipe emerging from the ground. It all looks a bit unkempt.

    Any thoughts on what could be done with this space to make it look better?

    a) Leave the area as it is, but tidy it up and consider planting some flowers among the rocks/pebbles
    b) Remove everything, flatten the area and create a fresh new border with new soil
    c) Some other solution
     

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  2. Irmemac

    Irmemac Total Gardener

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    If I remember correctly you will look directly at this border from the back of the house. I wouldn't keep the stones, but would have it cleared out to make a border fresh for planting. I would plant some evergreen shrubs at the back to give some year round interest, and some more colourful layered planting in front. Clumps of lupins and clouds of astilbe in front of the shrubs would give some summer colour, and you could add lavender, and bedding plants to brighten it up. I think you have a lovely garden with lots of potential, and I am sure you will get some great ideas from the very knowledgeable gardeners on here. Best of luck with it, and looking forward already to photos in due course!
     
  3. clanless

    clanless Super Gardener

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    Much to my shame :redface: :noidea: - I've just purchased a ready grown border - this one:

    Border Collection Three (2 x 2.6m) | J Parker Dutch Bulbs

    All perennials so will just need tidying up each year.

    If you have a look at this website - there are a couple of other 'border collections'.

    The deadline for buying is the end of this week.:spinning:
     
  4. sandhun

    sandhun Gardener

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    @Irmemac

    You're right, the border will be visible when looking out from the back of the house. Flattening out the area at the back will take a fair bit of work but I think you're right - it's probably the best course of action.

    Those large stones/rocks were inherited and TBH some of them are so big I won't be able to move them myself. But I think they're quite nice so I'm a little reluctant to throw them out. I'll see if I can perhaps use them elsewhere to make a feature in the gravel.

    I feel as if I owe you guys some photo updates so have posted them to my earlier thread on which I received lots of great advice

    How to create height and separation
     
  5. Loofah

    Loofah Well used member

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    c) Nuke it from orbit.

    Unhelpfulness from me aside, could you get a shot from further out so we can see it in context?
     
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    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      The depth of this border is the main problem sandhun. There isnt space for shrubs.
      I would clear it all out...hopefully the bamboo is not too established there.
      A couple of climbers would look good there; according to how sunny it is and how warm would affect your choices :)
       
    • sandhun

      sandhun Gardener

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      @Loofah see wide angle shot showing context (the border is right up against the fence).

      @Verdun Hi, I've added a photo so you can see where the border is. Fair point about lacking space for shrubs. It does get full sun in the mornings but is in shade afternoon/evening.
       

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    • Loofah

      Loofah Well used member

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      Looks like someone went for ultra low maintenance. Agree that the depth is an issue although shrubs can still be planted, I'd remove it all and start from scratch. Bamboo can be placed in huge pot which could look good centred and flanked by something but you'd have to keep the symmetry both sides to keep the garden looking balanced.

      Is it sunny down there? Acers in pots or planted would suit that style of gerden; skimmias also like shade so might be a solution for you
       
    • Verdun

      Verdun Passionate gardener

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      Nice job Samdhun.
      I would plant 4 or more climbers........trachelospermum, clematis montana, honeysuckle,(scented variety of course) clematis viticella (etoile violette is excellent), winter jasmine, summer jasmine and more will look great there :)
       
    • Doghouse Riley

      Doghouse Riley Head Gardener

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      Fences at the end of a garden can look ugly. If possible grow something up it to hide it.

      To hide ours I planted our "bamboo forest." (a mere 9" deep, but it creates an illusion of depth). I've tried to make this end bed look interesting by having plants that can be seen from a distance. When you actually get down there there's not a lot in it, mostly bluebells around now, some grasses, an azalea, a small acer, a hydrangea, a Sorbus tree and a wisteria trained up a dead tree stump.

      I think it's also a good idea to have other features that draw the eye down the garden in stages, so that the end bit doesn't seem so "in your face."

      P1060581.JPG

      P1060576.JPG
      P1060572.JPG
       
    • sandhun

      sandhun Gardener

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      The border at the back of the garden is in full sun for around 2 hours per day and after that, it's in shade for the remainder of the day. Since staring this thread I have planted a Rhodo, an Acer and a climbing Hydrenagea however most of the fence is still visible. I've recently emptied this rectangular planter (see image) and will use it to grow something up against the fence.

      Dimensions, 100cm wide by 33cm deep

      Can I fit a shrub in here or better off with some climbers suggested by the posters above?

      ps: At the time the photo was taken the garden looked particularly sparse because I planted seeds in the borders and raised beds but nothing had sprung up back then.
       

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